Part: III


Episode 16: Eumaeus


🕮
1
1 Preparatory to anything else Mr Bloom brushed off the greater
2 bulk
2 of the shavings and handed Stephen the hat and ashplant and bucked
3 him
3 up generally in ⸢3[good]good orthodox orthodox 3⸣ [good]good orthodox orthodox Samaritan fashion which he very
4badly needed.
4His (Stephen's) mind was not exactly what you would call
5 wandering but a
5 bit unsteady and on his expressed desire for ⸢3[something]something
6some ⸢4[commodity ]commodity beveragebeverage 4⸣ [commodity ]commodity beveragebeverage

6some ⸢4[commodity ]commodity beveragebeverage 4⸣ [commodity ]commodity beveragebeverage
3⸣
[something]something
6some ⸢4[commodity ]commodity beveragebeverage 4⸣ [commodity ]commodity beveragebeverage

6some ⸢4[commodity ]commodity beveragebeverage 4⸣ [commodity ]commodity beveragebeverage
to drink Mr
6Bloom in view of the hour it
7 was and there being no pump of Vartry water
7 available for their ablutions
8 let alone drinking purposes hit upon an
8 expedient⧼.⧽. by ⸢4[suggesting]suggesting
9suggesting, off the reel,

9suggesting, off the reel,
4⸣
[suggesting]suggesting
9suggesting, off the reel,

9suggesting, off the reel,
the propriety of the cabman's shelter,
9as it was
10 called, hardly a stonesthrow away⸢4hardly a stonesthrow away4⸣ near Butt ⸢2[bridge.]bridge. bridge where
11they
10might hit upon some drinkables in the shape of a milk and soda or a⸢4milk and soda or a4⸣
11
12mineral.
bridge where
11they
10might hit upon some drinkables in the shape of a milk and soda or a⸢4milk and soda or a4⸣
11
12mineral.
2⸣
[bridge.]bridge. bridge where
11they
10might hit upon some drinkables in the shape of a milk and soda or a⸢4milk and soda or a4⸣
11
12mineral.
bridge where
11they
10might hit upon some drinkables in the shape of a milk and soda or a⸢4milk and soda or a4⸣
11
12mineral.
But how to get there was the rub. For the nonce he was rather
12
13 nonplussed but inasmuch as the duty plainly⸢3plainly3⸣ devolved upon him to take
13
14some measures on the subject
⸢3to take
13
14some measures on the subject3⸣
he pondered suitable⸢3suitable3⸣ ways and means
15 during
14 which Stephen repeatedly yawned. So far as he could see he was
16 rather pale
15 in the face so that it occurred to him as highly advisable to get a
17 conveyance
16 of some description which would answer⸢2which would answer2⸣ in their then ⸢B[condition]condition
18 condition, both of
17them being e.d.ed, particularly Stephen,

18 condition, both of
17them being e.d.ed, particularly Stephen,
B⸣
[condition]condition
18 condition, both of
17them being e.d.ed, particularly Stephen,

18 condition, both of
17them being e.d.ed, particularly Stephen,

19 always assuming that there was
18 such a thing to be found. Accordingly after
20 a few such preliminaries as
19 ⸢1[brushing]brushing brushing, in spite of his having
21forgotten to take up his rather soapsuddy
20handkerchief after it had done
22yeoman service in the shaving line,
brushing, in spite of his having
21forgotten to take up his rather soapsuddy
20handkerchief after it had done
22yeoman service in the shaving line,
1⸣
[brushing]brushing brushing, in spite of his having
21forgotten to take up his rather soapsuddy
20handkerchief after it had done
22yeoman service in the shaving line,
brushing, in spite of his having
21forgotten to take up his rather soapsuddy
20handkerchief after it had done
22yeoman service in the shaving line,
they both
21 walked together along Beaver
23street or, more properly, lane as far as the
22 farrier's and the distinctly fetid
24 atmosphere of the livery stables at the
23 corner of Montgomery street⧼.⧽.
25 where they made tracks to the ⸢B[left,]left, left from left from B⸣ [left,]left, left from left from thence
24 debouching into
26 Amiens street round by the corner of Dan Bergin's. But as
25 he ⸢1[fully]fully
27confidently

27confidently
1⸣
[fully]fully
27confidently

27confidently
anticipated there was not a sign of a Jehu plying for hire
26
28 anywhere to be seen except a fourwheeler, probably engaged by some
27
29 fellows inside on the spree, outside the North Star hotel and there was no
28
30 symptom of its budging a quarter of⸢3a quarter of3⸣ an inch when Mr Bloom, who was
29
1 anything but a ⸢B[loud]loud professional professional B⸣ [loud]loud professional professional whistler, endeavoured to hail it by
2 emitting a
30 kind of a whistle, holding his arms arched over his head, twice.


31
3This was a quandary but, bringing common sense to bear on it,
32
4 evidently there was nothing for it but put a good face on the matter and foot
33
5 it which they accordingly did. So, bevelling around by Mullett's and the
34
6Signal House which they shortly reached, ⸢Bwhich they shortly reached, B⸣ they proceeded perforce⸢3perforce3⸣
7 in the
35 direction of Amiens street railway terminus, Mr Bloom being
8 handicapped
36 by the circumstance that one of the back buttons of his
9 trousers had, to vary
37 the timehonoured⸢4timehonoured4⸣ adage, gone the way of all buttons ⸢B[though]though
10 though, entering
38thoroughly into the spirit of the thing,

10 though, entering
38thoroughly into the spirit of the thing,
B⸣
[though]though
10 though, entering
38thoroughly into the spirit of the thing,

10 though, entering
38thoroughly into the spirit of the thing,
he
11 heroically made light of the
39 mischance. So as neither of them were
12particularly pressed for time, as it
40happened, and the temperature
13refreshing since it cleared up⸢2since it cleared up2⸣ after the recent
41visitation of Jupiter
14Pluvius,
⸢1as neither of them were
12particularly pressed for time, as it
40happened, and the temperature
13refreshing since it cleared up⸢2since it cleared up2⸣ after the recent
41visitation of Jupiter
14Pluvius,1⸣
they dandered along past by where the empty
42 vehicle was waiting
15 without a fare or a jarvey. As it so happened a Dublin
43 United Tramways
16 Company's sandstrewer happened to be returning and
44the elder man
17 recounted to his companion à propos of the incident his own
45 truly
18 miraculous escape of some little while back. They passed the main
46 entrance
19 of the Great Northern railway station, the starting point for
47 Belfast, where
20 of course all traffic was suspended at that late hour and
48 passing the
21backdoor of the morgue (a not very enticing locality, not to say
49 ⸢3[gruesome,]gruesome,
22 gruesome to a degree,

22 gruesome to a degree,
3⸣
[gruesome,]gruesome,
22 gruesome to a degree,

22 gruesome to a degree,
more especially at night) ultimately
23 gained the Dock
50 Tavern and in due course turned into Store street, famous
24 for its
51 C  division police station. Between this point and the high at present
25unlit
52 warehouses of Beresford place Stephen thought to think of Ibsen,
53
26 associated with Baird's the stonecutter's in his mind somehow in Talbot
54
27place, first turning on the right, while the other who was acting as his fidus
55
28Achates
inhaled with internal satisfaction the smell of James Rourke's city
56
29 bakery, situated quite close to where they were, the very palatable odour
57
30 indeed of our daily bread, of all commodities of the public the primary and
58
31 most indispensable. Bread, the staff of life, earn your bread, O tell me where
59
32 is fancy bread, at Rourke's the baker's it is said.


60
33En
route to his taciturn and, not to put too fine a point on it, not yet
61
34 perfectly sober companion Mr Bloom who at all events was in complete
62
35 possession of his faculties, never more so, in fact disgustingly sober,⸢3in fact disgustingly sober,3⸣
36 spoke a
63 word of caution re the dangers of nighttown, women of ill fame
1and swell
64mobsmen,
⸢1women of ill fame
1and swell
64mobsmen,1⸣
which, ⧼though⧽though barely permissible once in a while
2 though not as a
65 habitual practice, was of the nature of a regular deathtrap
3 for young
66 fellows of his age ⸢1[particularly.]particularly. particularly if they had
4acquired drinking habits
⸢4if they had
4acquired drinking habits4⸣
under
67the influence of ⸢3[liquor.]liquor. liquor unless
5you knew a little jiujitsu for every contingency
68as even a fellow on the broad
6of his back could administer a nasty kick if
69you didn't look out.
liquor unless
5you knew a little jiujitsu for every contingency
68as even a fellow on the broad
6of his back could administer a nasty kick if
69you didn't look out.
3⸣
[liquor.]liquor. liquor unless
5you knew a little jiujitsu for every contingency
68as even a fellow on the broad
6of his back could administer a nasty kick if
69you didn't look out.
liquor unless
5you knew a little jiujitsu for every contingency
68as even a fellow on the broad
6of his back could administer a nasty kick if
69you didn't look out.
particularly if they had
4acquired drinking habits
⸢4if they had
4acquired drinking habits4⸣
under
67the influence of ⸢3[liquor.]liquor. liquor unless
5you knew a little jiujitsu for every contingency
68as even a fellow on the broad
6of his back could administer a nasty kick if
69you didn't look out.
liquor unless
5you knew a little jiujitsu for every contingency
68as even a fellow on the broad
6of his back could administer a nasty kick if
69you didn't look out.
3⸣
[liquor.]liquor. liquor unless
5you knew a little jiujitsu for every contingency
68as even a fellow on the broad
6of his back could administer a nasty kick if
69you didn't look out.
liquor unless
5you knew a little jiujitsu for every contingency
68as even a fellow on the broad
6of his back could administer a nasty kick if
69you didn't look out.
1⸣
[particularly.]particularly. particularly if they had
4acquired drinking habits
⸢4if they had
4acquired drinking habits4⸣
under
67the influence of ⸢3[liquor.]liquor. liquor unless
5you knew a little jiujitsu for every contingency
68as even a fellow on the broad
6of his back could administer a nasty kick if
69you didn't look out.
liquor unless
5you knew a little jiujitsu for every contingency
68as even a fellow on the broad
6of his back could administer a nasty kick if
69you didn't look out.
3⸣
[liquor.]liquor. liquor unless
5you knew a little jiujitsu for every contingency
68as even a fellow on the broad
6of his back could administer a nasty kick if
69you didn't look out.
liquor unless
5you knew a little jiujitsu for every contingency
68as even a fellow on the broad
6of his back could administer a nasty kick if
69you didn't look out.
particularly if they had
4acquired drinking habits
⸢4if they had
4acquired drinking habits4⸣
under
67the influence of ⸢3[liquor.]liquor. liquor unless
5you knew a little jiujitsu for every contingency
68as even a fellow on the broad
6of his back could administer a nasty kick if
69you didn't look out.
liquor unless
5you knew a little jiujitsu for every contingency
68as even a fellow on the broad
6of his back could administer a nasty kick if
69you didn't look out.
3⸣
[liquor.]liquor. liquor unless
5you knew a little jiujitsu for every contingency
68as even a fellow on the broad
6of his back could administer a nasty kick if
69you didn't look out.
liquor unless
5you knew a little jiujitsu for every contingency
68as even a fellow on the broad
6of his back could administer a nasty kick if
69you didn't look out.
Highly
7 providential was the appearance on the scene of
70 Corny Kelleher when
8 Stephen was blissfully unconscious but for that man
71 in the gap turning
9up⧼,⧽, at the eleventh hour
⸢1turning
9up⧼,⧽, at the eleventh hour 1⸣
the finis might have been that he
72might have
10been a candidate for the accident ward or, failing that,
⸢1that he
72might have
10been a candidate for the accident ward or, failing that,1⸣
the
73bridewell and
11 an appearance in the court next dayin the court next day before Mr Tobias⧼,⧽, or, he
74 being the
12solicitor rather, old Wall, he meant to say, or ⸢4[Mahony.]Mahony. Mahonywhich
75
13simply spelt ruin for a chap when it got bruited about.
Mahonywhich
75
13simply spelt ruin for a chap when it got bruited about.
4⸣
[Mahony.]Mahony. Mahonywhich
75
13simply spelt ruin for a chap when it got bruited about.
Mahonywhich
75
13simply spelt ruin for a chap when it got bruited about.
⸢1[A]A The reason he
76
14mentioned the fact was that a
The reason he
76
14mentioned the fact was that a
1⸣
[A]A The reason he
76
14mentioned the fact was that a
The reason he
76
14mentioned the fact was that a
lot of those ⸢1[policemen]policemen policemen, whom
15he cordially
77disliked,
policemen, whom
15he cordially
77disliked,
1⸣
[policemen]policemen policemen, whom
15he cordially
77disliked,
policemen, whom
15he cordially
77disliked,
were admittedly unscrupulous in the service of the
16Crown
⸢3in the service of the
16Crown3⸣
and, as
78 Mr Bloom put it, recalling a case or two in the A  division
17 in Clanbrassil
79street, prepared to swear a hole through a ten gallon pot.
18 Never on the spot
80 when wanted but in quiet parts of the city, Pembroke
19road for example, ⸢B[they]they the
81guardians of the law
the
81guardians of the law
B⸣
[they]they the
81guardians of the law
the
81guardians of the law
were well in evidence,
20 the obvious reason being they
82 were paid to protect the upper classes.
21 Another thing he commented on was
83 equipping soldiers with ⸢1[arms]arms
22firearms or sidearms

22firearms or sidearms
1⸣
[arms]arms
22firearms or sidearms

22firearms or sidearms
of any ⸢1[kind ]kind description description 1⸣ [kind ]kind description description liable to go
84off at any
23time
⸢2liable to go
84off at any
23time2⸣
which was tantamount to inciting them against ⸢2[civilians.]civilians.civilians
85
24should by any chance they fall out over anything.
civilians
85
24should by any chance they fall out over anything.
2⸣
[civilians.]civilians.civilians
85
24should by any chance they fall out over anything.
civilians
85
24should by any chance they fall out over anything.
You frittered away your
86
25 time, he very sensibly ⸢3[remarked,]remarked, maintained, maintained, 3⸣ [remarked,]remarked, maintained, maintained, and health and also
26 character besides
87 ⸢2[which ]which which, the squandermania of the thing, which, the squandermania of the thing, 2⸣ [which ]which which, the squandermania of the thing, which, the squandermania of the thing, fast
27women of the demimonde ran
88 away with a lot of £. s. d. into the bargain
28 and the greatest danger of all was
89 who you got drunk ⸢3[with.]with. with
29though⧽

29though
though, touching the muchmuch vexed question of
90stimulants,
though, touching the muchmuch vexed question of
90stimulants,

29though⧽

29though
though, touching the muchmuch vexed question of
90stimulants,
though, touching the muchmuch vexed question of
90stimulants,
he
30relished a glass of choice old wine in season as both
91nourishing and
31bloodmaking and possessing aperient virtues⸢4and possessing aperient virtues4⸣ (notably a
92good burgundy
32which he was a staunch believer in

32which he was a staunch believer in
) still never beyond a
93certain point
33where he invariably drew the line as it simply led to trouble all
94round to say
34nothing of your being at the tender mercy of others
95practically.
with
29though⧽

29though
though, touching the muchmuch vexed question of
90stimulants,
though, touching the muchmuch vexed question of
90stimulants,

29though⧽

29though
though, touching the muchmuch vexed question of
90stimulants,
though, touching the muchmuch vexed question of
90stimulants,
he
30relished a glass of choice old wine in season as both
91nourishing and
31bloodmaking and possessing aperient virtues⸢4and possessing aperient virtues4⸣ (notably a
92good burgundy
32which he was a staunch believer in

32which he was a staunch believer in
) still never beyond a
93certain point
33where he invariably drew the line as it simply led to trouble all
94round to say
34nothing of your being at the tender mercy of others
95practically.
3⸣
[with.]with. with
29though⧽

29though
though, touching the muchmuch vexed question of
90stimulants,
though, touching the muchmuch vexed question of
90stimulants,

29though⧽

29though
though, touching the muchmuch vexed question of
90stimulants,
though, touching the muchmuch vexed question of
90stimulants,
he
30relished a glass of choice old wine in season as both
91nourishing and
31bloodmaking and possessing aperient virtues⸢4and possessing aperient virtues4⸣ (notably a
92good burgundy
32which he was a staunch believer in

32which he was a staunch believer in
) still never beyond a
93certain point
33where he invariably drew the line as it simply led to trouble all
94round to say
34nothing of your being at the tender mercy of others
95practically.
with
29though⧽

29though
though, touching the muchmuch vexed question of
90stimulants,
though, touching the muchmuch vexed question of
90stimulants,

29though⧽

29though
though, touching the muchmuch vexed question of
90stimulants,
though, touching the muchmuch vexed question of
90stimulants,
he
30relished a glass of choice old wine in season as both
91nourishing and
31bloodmaking and possessing aperient virtues⸢4and possessing aperient virtues4⸣ (notably a
92good burgundy
32which he was a staunch believer in

32which he was a staunch believer in
) still never beyond a
93certain point
33where he invariably drew the line as it simply led to trouble all
94round to say
34nothing of your being at the tender mercy of others
95practically.
Most of all
35 he commented adversely on the desertion of Stephen
96 by all his pubhunting
36confrères
but one, a most glaring piece of ratting on
97the part of his
37brother medicos
⸢1on
97the part of his
37brother medicos1⸣
under all the circs.


98
1And that one was Judas, Stephen said, who up to then had said nothing
99
2whatsoever
⸢B
2whatsoeverB⸣
of any kind.


100
3Discussing these and kindred topics they made a beeline across the
101
4back of the Customhouse and
⸢3made a beeline across the
101
4back of the Customhouse and3⸣
passed under the Loop Line bridge where a
102
5 brazier of coke burning in front of a sentrybox or something like one
103
6 attracted their rather lagging footsteps. Stephen of his own accord⸢4of his own accord4⸣
7 stopped
104 for no special reason to look at the heap of barren cobblestones and
8 by the
105 light emanating from the brazier he could just make out the darker
9 figure of
106 the corporation watchman inside the gloom of the sentrybox. He
10 began to
107 remember that this had happened or had been mentioned as
11 having
108happened before but it cost him no small effort before he
12 remembered that
109 he recognised in the sentry a quondam friend of his
13 father's, Gumley. To
110 avoid a meeting he drew nearer to the pillars of the
14 railway bridge.


111
15Someone saluted you, Mr Bloom said.


112
16A figure of middle height⸢1of middle height1⸣ on the prowl evidently under the arches
113
17 saluted again, calling:


114
18Night!


115
19 Stephen of course started rather dizzily and stopped to return the
116
20 compliment. Mr Bloom actuated by motives of inherent⸢1inherent1⸣ delicacy
21inasmuch
117as he always believed in minding his own business
⸢4
21inasmuch
117as he always believed in minding his own business 4⸣
moved off
22 but
118nevertheless remained on the qui vive with just a shade of ⸢4[anxiety.]anxiety.
23anxiety though
119not funkyish in the least.

23anxiety though
119not funkyish in the least.
4⸣
[anxiety.]anxiety.
23anxiety though
119not funkyish in the least.

23anxiety though
119not funkyish in the least.
Though unusual in the⸢3the3⸣ Dublin
24area
⸢3
24area3⸣
he knew that
120 it was not by any means unknown for desperadoes
25 who had next to nothing
121 to live on to be abroad waylaying and generally
26 terrorising respectable⧽respectable peaceable peaceable respectable⧽respectable peaceable peaceable
122 pedestrians by placing a pistol at
27their head
⸢Bby placing a pistol at
27their headB⸣
in some secluded spot outside
123 the city proper, famished loiterers
28of the Thames embankment category
⸢3
28of the Thames embankment category3⸣

124 they might be hanging about there
29 or simply marauders ready to decamp
125 with ⸢B[anything and everything ]anything and everything
30whatever boodle they could

30whatever boodle they could
B⸣
[anything and everything ]anything and everything
30whatever boodle they could

30whatever boodle they could
in one fell swoop⸢3in one fell swoop3⸣ at a moment's notice,
126 your
31 money or your ⸢3[life.]life. life, leaving you there to point a moral, gagged and
127
32garrotted.
life, leaving you there to point a moral, gagged and
127
32garrotted.
3⸣
[life.]life. life, leaving you there to point a moral, gagged and
127
32garrotted.
life, leaving you there to point a moral, gagged and
127
32garrotted.


128
33Stephen, that is when the accosting figure came to close quarters,
129
34 though he was not in an over sober state himself recognised Corley's
35 breath
130 redolent of rotten cornjuice. Lord John Corley some called him and
36 his
131 genealogy came about in this wise. He was the eldest son of inspector
132
1Corley of the G  division, lately deceased, who had married a certain
133
2 Katherine Brophy, the daughter of a Louth farmer. His grandfather
134
3 Patrick Michael Corley of New Ross had married the widow of a publican
135
4 there whose maiden name had been Katherine (also) Talbot. Rumour had it
136
5(though not proved) that she descended from the house of the lords Talbot
137
6 de Malahide in whose ⸢1[mansion]mansion mansion, really an unquestionably fine
7residence of
138 its kind
of
138 its kind
and well worth seeing,
mansion, really an unquestionably fine
7residence of
138 its kind
of
138 its kind
and well worth seeing,
1⸣
[mansion]mansion mansion, really an unquestionably fine
7residence of
138 its kind
of
138 its kind
and well worth seeing,
mansion, really an unquestionably fine
7residence of
138 its kind
of
138 its kind
and well worth seeing,
her mother or aunt or some
8relative, ⧼had⧽had a
139 woman, as the tale went, of extreme beauty, had enjoyed
9 the distinction of
140 being in service in the washkitchen. This therefore was the
10 reason why the
141 still comparatively young though dissolute man who now
11 addressed
142 Stephen was spoken of by some with facetious proclivities as
12 lord⧽lord Lord Lord lord⧽lord Lord Lord John
143Corley.


144
13Taking Stephen on one side he had the customary doleful ditty to tell.
145
14 Not as much as a farthing to purchase a night's lodgings. His friends had
146
15 all deserted him. Furthermore he had a row with Lenehan and called him to
147
16 Stephen a mean bloody swab with a sprinkling of a number of other
148
17uncalledfor expressions. He was out of a job and implored of Stephen to
149
18 tell him where on God's earth he could get something, anything at all, to do.
150
19 No, it was the daughter of the mother in the washkitchen that was
151
20 fostersister to the heir of the ⸢3[house,]house, house or else they were connected
21through the
152mother in some way,
house or else they were connected
21through the
152mother in some way,
3⸣
[house,]house, house or else they were connected
21through the
152mother in some way,
house or else they were connected
21through the
152mother in some way,
both occurrences happening at the same ⸢1[time.]time.
22 time if the
153whole thing wasn't a complete fabrication from start to
23finish.

22 time if the
153whole thing wasn't a complete fabrication from start to
23finish.
1⸣
[time.]time.
22 time if the
153whole thing wasn't a complete fabrication from start to
23finish.

22 time if the
153whole thing wasn't a complete fabrication from start to
23finish.
Anyhow he
154 was all in.


155
24I wouldn't ask you only, pursued he, on my solemn oath and God knows
156
25 I'm on the rocks.


157
26There'll be a job tomorrow or next day, Stephen told him, in a boys'
158
27 school at Dalkey for a gentleman usher. Mr Garrett Deasy. Try it. You may
159
28 mention my name.


160
29Ah, God, Corley replied, sure I couldn't teach in a school, man. I was
161
30 never one of your bright ones, he added with a half laugh. I got stuck twice
162
31 in the junior at the christian brothers.


163
32I have no place to sleep myself, Stephen informed him.


164
33Corley at the first go‐off was inclined to suspect it was something to
165
34 do with Stephen being fired out of his digs for bringing in a bloody tart off
166
35 the street. There was a dosshouse in Marlborough street, Mrs Maloney's,
167
36 but it was only a tanner touch and full of undesirables but M‘Conachie told
168
1 him you got a decent enough do in the Brazen Head over in Winetavern
169
2street (which was distantly suggestive to the person addressed of friar
170
3Bacon)
⸢4(which was distantly suggestive to the person addressed of friar
170
3Bacon)4⸣
for a bob. He was starving too though he hadn't said a word about
171
4it.


172
5Though this sort of thing went on every other night or very near it
173
6 still Stephen's feelings got the better of him in a sense⸢1in a sense1⸣ though he knew
7 that
174 Corley's brandnew rigmarole on a par with the others was hardly
8 deserving
175 of much credence. However haud ignarus malorum miseris
9 succurrere disco
176 etcetera
as the Latin poet remarks⸢4as the Latin poet remarks4⸣ especially as luck
10would have it he got
177paid his screw after every middle of the month on the
11 sixteenth which was
178the date of the month as a matter of ⸢1[fact.]fact. fact
12though a good bit of it⧽it the
179wherewithal
the
179wherewithal
it⧽it the
179wherewithal
the
179wherewithal
was demolished.
fact
12though a good bit of it⧽it the
179wherewithal
the
179wherewithal
it⧽it the
179wherewithal
the
179wherewithal
was demolished.
1⸣
[fact.]fact. fact
12though a good bit of it⧽it the
179wherewithal
the
179wherewithal
it⧽it the
179wherewithal
the
179wherewithal
was demolished.
fact
12though a good bit of it⧽it the
179wherewithal
the
179wherewithal
it⧽it the
179wherewithal
the
179wherewithal
was demolished.
But the cream
13 of the joke was nothing would
180 get it out of Corley's head that he was living
14 in affluence and hadn't a thing
181 to do but hand out the needful. Whereas.
15 He put his hand in a pocket
182anyhow not with the idea of finding any food
16there but thinking he might
183 lend him anything up to a bob or so in lieu so
17 that he might endeavour at all
184 events and get sufficient to eat but the result
18 was in the negative ⸢1[for]for for, to his
185chagrin,
for, to his
185chagrin,
1⸣
[for]for for, to his
185chagrin,
for, to his
185chagrin,
he found his ⸢1[money]money cash cash 1⸣ [money]money cash cash
19 missing. A few broken biscuits were ⸢1[all.]all. all the result
186of his
20investigation.
all the result
186of his
20investigation.
1⸣
[all.]all. all the result
186of his
20investigation.
all the result
186of his
20investigation.
He tried his hardesthis hardest to recollect for the moment
187 whether
21 he had lost as well he might have or left because in that
188 contingency it was
22 not a pleasant lookout, very much the reverse in fact. He
189 was altogether too
23 fagged out to institute a thorough search though he tried
190 to recollect. About
24 biscuits he dimly remembered. Who now exactly gave
191them he wondered or
25 where was or did he buy. However in another pocket
192 he came across what
26 he surmised in the dark were pennies, erroneously
193 ⸢3[however.]however. however, as
27it turned out.
however, as
27it turned out.
3⸣
[however.]however. however, as
27it turned out.
however, as
27it turned out.


194
28Those are halfcrowns, man, Corley corrected him.


195
29And so in point of fact they turned out to be. Stephen anyhow lent
196
30 him one of them.


197
31Thanks, Corley answered, you're a gentleman. I'll pay you back one
198
32 time. Who's that with you? I saw him a few times in the Bleeding Horse in
199
33Camden street
⸢3in the Bleeding Horse in
199
33Camden street3⸣
with Boylan, the billsticker. You might put in a good word
200
34 for us to get me taken on there. I'd carry a sandwichboard only the girl in
201
35 the office told me they're full up for the next three weeks, man. God, you've
202
36 to book ahead, man, you'd think it was for thethe Carl Rosa. I don't give a
203
37 shite anyway so long as I get a ⸢3[job.]job. job, even as a crossing sweeper. job, even as a crossing sweeper. 3⸣ [job.]job. job, even as a crossing sweeper. job, even as a crossing sweeper.


204
1Subsequently being not quite so down in the mouth after the two and
205
2 six he got he informed Stephen about a fellow by the name of Bags
206
3 Comisky that he said Stephen knew well out of Fullam's, the
207
4shipchandler's, bookkeeper there that used to be often round in Nagle's
208
5 back with O'Mara and a little chap with a stutter ⸢2[called]calledthe name ofthe name of 2⸣ [called]calledthe name ofthe name of
6Tighe.
209Anyhow he was lagged the night before last and fined ten bob for a
7 drunk
210 and disorderly and refusing to go with the constable.


211
8Mr Bloom in the meanwhile kept dodging about in the vicinity of the
212
9 cobblestones near the brazier of coke in front of the corporation
213
10 watchman's sentrybox who evidently a glutton for work, it struck him,
11 was
214 having a quiet forty winks for all intents and purposes⸢1for all intents and purposes1⸣ on his own
12 private
215 account while Dublin slept. He threw an odd eye at the same time
13 now and
216 then at Stephen's anything but immaculately attired⸢Banything but immaculately attiredB⸣ interlocutor
14 as if he
217 had seen that nobleman somewhere or ⸢3[other.]other. other though where
15he was not in a
218position to truthfullytruthfully state nor had he the remotest idea
16 when
nor had he the remotest idea
16 when
.
other though where
15he was not in a
218position to truthfullytruthfully state nor had he the remotest idea
16 when
nor had he the remotest idea
16 when
.
3⸣
[other.]other. other though where
15he was not in a
218position to truthfullytruthfully state nor had he the remotest idea
16 when
nor had he the remotest idea
16 when
.
other though where
15he was not in a
218position to truthfullytruthfully state nor had he the remotest idea
16 when
nor had he the remotest idea
16 when
.
He⧽He Being a
219 levelheaded⸢1 levelheaded1⸣ ⸢3[person]person individual individual 3⸣ [person]person individual individual who could give
17 points to not a few in point of shrewd
220observation he
Being a
219 levelheaded⸢1 levelheaded1⸣ ⸢3[person]person individual individual 3⸣ [person]person individual individual who could give
17 points to not a few in point of shrewd
220observation he
He⧽He Being a
219 levelheaded⸢1 levelheaded1⸣ ⸢3[person]person individual individual 3⸣ [person]person individual individual who could give
17 points to not a few in point of shrewd
220observation he
Being a
219 levelheaded⸢1 levelheaded1⸣ ⸢3[person]person individual individual 3⸣ [person]person individual individual who could give
17 points to not a few in point of shrewd
220observation he
also remarked on his
18 very dilapidated hat and slouchy
221 wearing apparel generally testifying to a
19 chronic impecuniosity. Palpably he
222 was one of his hangerson but for the
20 matter of that it was merely a question
223 of one preying on ⸢3[another]another his
21nextdoor neighbour
his
21nextdoor neighbour
3⸣
[another]another his
21nextdoor neighbour
his
21nextdoor neighbour
all round, in every deep, so to put
224 it, a deeper ⸢3[depth.]depth.
22 depth and for the matter of that if the man in the street chanced
225to
23be in the dock himself penal servitude with or without the option of a fine
226
24would be a very rara avis altogether.

22 depth and for the matter of that if the man in the street chanced
225to
23be in the dock himself penal servitude with or without the option of a fine
226
24would be a very rara avis altogether.
3⸣
[depth.]depth.
22 depth and for the matter of that if the man in the street chanced
225to
23be in the dock himself penal servitude with or without the option of a fine
226
24would be a very rara avis altogether.

22 depth and for the matter of that if the man in the street chanced
225to
23be in the dock himself penal servitude with or without the option of a fine
226
24would be a very rara avis altogether.
In any case he had a consummate
227
25 amount of cool⸢3cool3⸣ assurance intercepting people at that hour of the night or
228
26 morning. Pretty thick that was certainly.


229
27The pair parted company and Stephen rejoined Mr Bloom ⸢B[who]who
28who, with
230his practised eye,

28who, with
230his practised eye,
B⸣
[who]who
28who, with
230his practised eye,

28who, with
230his practised eye,
was not without perceiving that he had
29 succumbed to the
231 blandiloquence of the other parasite. Alluding to the
30 encounter he said,
232 ⸢4[laughing,]laughing,laughingly,laughingly, 4⸣ [laughing,]laughing,laughingly,laughingly, Stephen, that is:


233
31He is down on his luck. He asked me to ask you to ask somebody named
234
32 Boylan, a billsticker, to give him a job as a sandwichman.


235
33At this ⸢1[intelligence]intelligence intelligence, in which he seemingly evinced little
34interest,
intelligence, in which he seemingly evinced little
34interest,
1⸣
[intelligence]intelligence intelligence, in which he seemingly evinced little
34interest,
intelligence, in which he seemingly evinced little
34interest,
Mr
236 Bloom gazed abstractedly for the space of a ⸢B[moment]moment half a
35second
half a
35second
B⸣
[moment]moment half a
35second
half a
35second
or so in the
237 direction of a ⸢2[bucketdredger]bucketdredger bucketdredger,
36rejoicing in the farfamed name of Eblana,
bucketdredger,
36rejoicing in the farfamed name of Eblana,
2⸣
[bucketdredger]bucketdredger bucketdredger,
36rejoicing in the farfamed name of Eblana,
bucketdredger,
36rejoicing in the farfamed name of Eblana,

238 moored alongside
⸢1a ⸢2[bucketdredger]bucketdredger bucketdredger,
36rejoicing in the farfamed name of Eblana,
bucketdredger,
36rejoicing in the farfamed name of Eblana,
2⸣
[bucketdredger]bucketdredger bucketdredger,
36rejoicing in the farfamed name of Eblana,
bucketdredger,
36rejoicing in the farfamed name of Eblana,

238 moored alongside1⸣
⸢4[Burgh]Burgh
1Customhouse

1Customhouse
4⸣
[Burgh]Burgh
1Customhouse

1Customhouse
quay and quite possibly out of repair,⸢3and quite possibly out of repair,3⸣
239 whereupon he
2 observed evasively:


240
3Everybody gets ⸢1[a certain]a certain their own their own 1⸣ [a certain]a certain their own their own ration of luck, they say. Now you
4 mention it
241 his face was familiar to me. But, leaving that for the moment,
5 how much did
242 you part with, he queried, if I am not too inquisitive?


243
6Half a crown, Stephen responded. I daresay he needs it to sleep
244
7 somewhere.


245
8Needs! Mr Bloom ejaculated, professing not the least surprise at the
246
9intelligence,
⸢3professing not the least surprise at the
246
9intelligence,3⸣
I can quite credit the assertion and⸢4I can quite credit the assertion and4⸣ I guarantee he invariably
247
10 does. Everyone according to his needs or everyone according to his deeds.
248 ⸢1[Where]Where
11 But, talking about things in general, where, added he with a
12smile,

11 But, talking about things in general, where, added he with a
12smile,
1⸣
[Where]Where
11 But, talking about things in general, where, added he with a
12smile,

11 But, talking about things in general, where, added he with a
12smile,
will you
249 sleep yourself? Walking to Sandycove is out of the
13question. And even
250 supposing you did you won't get in after what
14 occurred at Westland Row
251 station simply⧽station simply station. Simply station. Simply station simply⧽station simply station. Simply station. Simply fag out
15 there for nothing. I don't mean to presume to dictate
252 to you in the slightest
16 degreedegree but why did you leave your father's house?


253
17To seek misfortune, ⸢2[Stephen replied.]Stephen replied.was Stephen's answer.was Stephen's answer. 2⸣ [Stephen replied.]Stephen replied.was Stephen's answer.was Stephen's answer.


254
18I met your respected father on a recent occasionon a recent occasion, Mr Bloom
255 ⸢3[remarked,]remarked,
19 diplomatically returned,

19 diplomatically returned,
3⸣
[remarked,]remarked,
19 diplomatically returned,

19 diplomatically returned,
today in factin fact, or to be strictly
20 accurate, on
256 yesterday. Where does he live at present? I gathered in the
21 course of
257 conversation that he had moved.


258
22I believe he is in Dublin somewhere, Stephen answered unconcernedly.
259
23 Why?


260
24A gifted man, Mr Bloom said of Mr Dedalus seniorof Mr Dedalus senior, in more respects
25 than
261 ⸢4[one.]one.one and a born raconteur if ever there was one.one and a born raconteur if ever there was one. 4⸣ [one.]one.one and a born raconteur if ever there was one.one and a born raconteur if ever there was one. He takes
26 great pride, quite
262legitimate, out of you. You could go back perhaps, he
27hasarded, still
263 thinking of the very unpleasant scene at Westland Row
28 terminus when it
264 was perfectly evident that the other two, Mulligan, that is,
29 and that English
265 tourist friend of ⸢1[his]his his, who eventually euchred their
30third companion,
his, who eventually euchred their
30third companion,
1⸣
[his]his his, who eventually euchred their
30third companion,
his, who eventually euchred their
30third companion,
were
266 patently trying as if the whole bally⸢4bally4⸣ station
31 belonged to them
as if the whole bally⸢4bally4⸣ station
31 belonged to them
to give
267 Stephen the slip in the confusion, which they did.


268
32There was no response forthcoming to the suggestion however, such
269
33 as it was, Stephen's mind's eye being too busily engaged in repicturing his
270
34 family hearth the last time he saw it with his sister Dilly sitting by the ingle,
271
35 her hair hanging down, waiting for some weak Trinidad shell cocoa that
272
36 was in the sootcoated kettle to be done so that she and he could drink it
273
1 with the oatmealwater for milk after the Friday herrings they had eaten at
274
2 two a penny with an egg apiece for ⸢1[Maggie,]Maggie, Maggy, Maggy, 1⸣ [Maggie,]Maggie, Maggy, Maggy, Boody and Katey,
3 the cat
275 meanwhile under the mangle ⧼devoured⧽devoured devouring a mess of
4 eggshells and charred fish
276 heads and bones on a square of brown paper, in
5 accordance with the third
277 precept of the church to fast and abstain on the
6 days commanded, it being
278 quarter tense⧼. . or if not, ember ⸢1[days.]days. days
7or something like that.
days
7or something like that.
1⸣
[days.]days. days
7or something like that.
days
7or something like that.


279
8No, Mr Bloom repeated again, I wouldn't personally repose muchrepose much trust
9 inin
280 that boon companion of yours who contributes the humorous
10 element
who contributes the humorous
10 element
, Dr
281 Mulligan, as a guide, philosopher and friend⧼.⧽. if I were ⸢3[you.]you.
11 in your shoes.

11 in your shoes.
3⸣
[you.]you.
11 in your shoes.

11 in your shoes.
He
282 knows which side his bread is buttered on
12though in all probability he never
283 realised what it is to be without regular
13 meals. Of course you didn't notice
284 as much as I did. But it wouldn't
14 occasion me the least surprise to learn that
285 a pinch of tobacco or some
15 narcotic was put in your drink for some ulterior
286 object.


287
16He understood however from all he heard that Dr Mulligan was a
288
17 versatile allround ⸢1[man]man man, by no means confined to medicine only, man, by no means confined to medicine only, 1⸣ [man]man man, by no means confined to medicine only, man, by no means confined to medicine only,
18 who was
289 rapidly coming to the fore in his line and, if the⸢1the1⸣ report was
19verified, bade
290fair to enjoy a flourishing practice in the not too distant
20future
⸢Band, if the⸢1the1⸣ report was
19verified, bade
290fair to enjoy a flourishing practice in the not too distant
20futureB⸣
as a tony
291medical practitioner drawing a handsome fee for his
21services
⸢3as a tony
291medical practitioner drawing a handsome fee for his
21services3⸣
in addition to
292 which professional status his rescue of that man
22 from certain drowning by
293artificial respiration and what they call first
23aid
⸢3by
293artificial respiration and what they call first
23aid3⸣
at Skerries, or Malahide
294 was it?, was, he was bound to admit, an
24 exceedingly plucky deed which he
295 could not too highly praise,
⸢4which he
295 could not too highly praise,4⸣
so that
25frankly
⸢3
25frankly3⸣
he was utterly at a loss to
296fathom what earthly reason could be at
26 the back of it except he put it down
297to ⸢4[jealousy.]jealousy.sheer cussedness or
27jealousy, pure and simple.
sheer cussedness or
27jealousy, pure and simple.
4⸣
[jealousy.]jealousy.sheer cussedness or
27jealousy, pure and simple.
sheer cussedness or
27jealousy, pure and simple.


298
28Except it simply amounts to one thing and⸢1it simply amounts to one thing and1⸣ he is what they call picking
299
29 your brains, he ventured to ⸢3[say.]say. throw out. throw out. 3⸣ [say.]say. throw out. throw out.


300
30The guarded⸢1guarded1⸣ glance of half solicitude half curiosity augmented by
301
31friendliness which he gave at Stephen's at present morose expression of
302
32 features did not throw a flood of light, none at all in fact on the problem as
303
33 to whether he had let himself be badly ⸢3[taken in ]taken in bamboozled bamboozled 3⸣ [taken in ]taken in bamboozled bamboozled to judge
34 by two or three
304 lowspirited⸢1 lowspirited1⸣ remarks he let drop or ⸢1[on the other hand ]on the other hand
35the other way about

35the other way about
1⸣
[on the other hand ]on the other hand
35the other way about

35the other way about
saw through the
305affair and for some reason or other
36 best known to himself allowed matters
306 to more or less. Grinding poverty
1did have that effect and he more than
307 conjectured that, ⸢4[highly educated
2though he was,]
highly educated
2though he was,
high educational abilities though he possessed,high educational abilities though he possessed, 4⸣
[highly educated
2though he was,]
highly educated
2though he was,
high educational abilities though he possessed,high educational abilities though he possessed,
he
308
3experienced no little difficulty in making both ends meet.


309
4Adjacent to the men's public urinal they perceived an icecream car
310
5round which a group of presumably Italians in heated altercation⸢3in heated altercation3⸣ were
311
6 getting rid of voluble expressions in their vivacious⸢4vivacious4⸣ language in a
312
7particularly animated ⸢4[way.]way. way, there being some little differences
8between the
313parties.
way, there being some little differences
8between the
313parties.
4⸣
[way.]way. way, there being some little differences
8between the
313parties.
way, there being some little differences
8between the
313parties.


314
9Puttana
madonna, che ci dia i quattrini! Ho ragione? Culo rotto!


315
10Intendiamoci. Mezzo sovrano più
 ....


316
11Dice lui,
però! 


317
12 Mezzo.


318
13 Farabutto!  Mortacci sui! 


319
14 Ma ascolta! Cinque la testa più ...


320
15Mr Bloom and Stephen entered the cabman's shelter, an
321
16 unpretentious wooden structure, where, prior to then, he had rarely if ever
322
17 been before, the former having previously whispered to the latter a few
323
18 hints anent the keeper of it said to be the once famous Skin‐the‐Goat,
324
19 Fitzharris, the invincible, though he could not vouch for the actual facts
325
20 which quite possibly there was not one vestige of truth in. ⸢1[They took their
21seats]
They took their
21seats
A few moments
326later saw our two noctambules safely seated
A few moments
326later saw our two noctambules safely seated
1⸣
[They took their
21seats]
They took their
21seats
A few moments
326later saw our two noctambules safely seated
A few moments
326later saw our two noctambules safely seated
in a
22 discreet corner only to be
327 greeted by stares from the decidedly
23 miscellaneous collection of waifs and
328 strays and other nondescript
24specimens of the genus homo
⸢4and other nondescript
24specimens of the genus homo 4⸣
already there
329 engaged in eating and drinking
25 diversified by conversation for whom they
330 seemingly formed an object of
26marked
⸢4
26marked4⸣
curiosity.
331


27Now touching a cup of coffee, Mr Bloom ⸢3[suggested,]suggested,ventured to
28plausibly
⸢4
28plausibly4⸣
suggest to
332break the ice,
ventured to
28plausibly
⸢4
28plausibly4⸣
suggest to
332break the ice,
3⸣
[suggested,]suggested,ventured to
28plausibly
⸢4
28plausibly4⸣
suggest to
332break the ice,
ventured to
28plausibly
⸢4
28plausibly4⸣
suggest to
332break the ice,
⸢1[and]and it occurs to me you ⸢3[want]want
29ought to sample

29ought to sample
3⸣
[want]want
29ought to sample

29ought to sample
it occurs to me you ⸢3[want]want
29ought to sample

29ought to sample
3⸣
[want]want
29ought to sample

29ought to sample
1⸣
[and]and it occurs to me you ⸢3[want]want
29ought to sample

29ought to sample
3⸣
[want]want
29ought to sample

29ought to sample
it occurs to me you ⸢3[want]want
29ought to sample

29ought to sample
3⸣
[want]want
29ought to sample

29ought to sample
something in the shape of
333 solid food, say, a roll of some ⸢3[sort.]sort.
30 description.

30 description.
3⸣
[sort.]sort.
30 description.

30 description.


334
31 ⸢2[He ordered]He orderedAccordingly his first act was with characteristic
32sangfroid
⸢3with characteristic
32sangfroid
3⸣
to order
Accordingly his first act was with characteristic
32sangfroid
⸢3with characteristic
32sangfroid
3⸣
to order
2⸣
[He ordered]He orderedAccordingly his first act was with characteristic
32sangfroid
⸢3with characteristic
32sangfroid
3⸣
to order
Accordingly his first act was with characteristic
32sangfroid
⸢3with characteristic
32sangfroid
3⸣
to order

335these commodities quietly. The hoi polloi of⸢1 hoi polloi of1⸣ jarvies
33 or stevedores or
336 whatever they were after a cursory examination ⸢3after a cursory examination 3⸣ turned
34 their eyes,
337 apparently dissatisfied, away though one redbearded bibulous
35individual,
338 portion of whose hair was greyish,⸢1 portion of whose hair was greyish,1⸣ a sailor probably, still
1 stared for some
339 appreciable time before transferring his rapt⸢3rapt3⸣ attention to
2 the floor. Mr
340 Bloom, availing himself of the right of free speech, he having
3just a bowing
341acquaintance with the language in dispute, though , to be
4 sure,
, to be
4 sure,
rather in a
342quandary over voglio,
⸢Bhe having
3just a bowing
341acquaintance with the language in dispute, though , to be
4 sure,
, to be
4 sure,
rather in a
342quandary over voglio,B⸣
remarked to his protégé in an
5 audible tone of voice
in an
5 audible tone of voice

343à
propos of the ⸢1[wrangle]wrangle battle royal battle royal 1⸣ [wrangle]wrangle battle royal battle royal in the street
6 which was still raging fast and
344furious:


345
7A beautiful language. I mean for singing purposes. Why do you not write
346
8 your poetry in that language? Bella ⸢1[ Poetria. ] Poetria. Poetria! Poetria! 1⸣ [ Poetria. ] Poetria. Poetria! Poetria! It is so melodious
9 and full.
347 ⸢3[ Bella Donna. ] Bella Donna. Belladonna. Belladonna. 3⸣ [ Bella Donna. ] Bella Donna. Belladonna. Belladonna. Voglio. Voglio.


348
10Stephen, who was trying his deaddead best to yawn if he could,
11 suffering
349from lassitude generally
>suffering
349from lassitude generally<
if he could,
11 suffering
349from lassitude generally
>suffering
349from lassitude generally<
, replied:


350
12To fill the ear of a cow elephant. They were haggling over money.


351
13Is that so? Mr Bloom asked. Of course, he subjoined pensively, at the
352
14inward reflection of there being more languages to start with than were
353
15absolutely necessary,
⸢1at the
352
14inward reflection of there being more languages to start with than were
353
15absolutely necessary,1⸣
it may be only the southern glamour that surrounds
16 it.


354
17The keeper of the shelter in the middle of this tête‐à‐tête ⸢1in the middle of this tête‐à‐tête 1⸣ put a
18 boiling
355 swimming cup of a choice⸢1choice1⸣ concoction labelleda choice⸢1choice1⸣ concoction labelled coffee on the
19 table and a
356 rather antediluvian specimen of a bun, or so it seemed. After
20 which he ⸢4[retreated]retreatedbeat
357a retreat
beat
357a retreat
4⸣
[retreated]retreatedbeat
357a retreat
beat
357a retreat
to his counter, Mr Bloom determining
21 to have a good square⸢BsquareB⸣ look
358 at him later on so as not to appear ⧼to f⧽to f to.
22 For which reason he encouraged
359 Stephen to proceed with his eyes while
23he did the honours by
⸢1
23he did the honours by1⸣
surreptitiously
360 pushing the cup of what was
24temporarily
⸢2
24temporarily2⸣
supposed to be called coffee
361gradually nearer him.


362
25Sounds are impostures, Stephen ⸢1[said, ]said, said after a pause of some little
26time,
said after a pause of some little
26time,
1⸣
[said, ]said, said after a pause of some little
26time,
said after a pause of some little
26time,
like
363names. Cicero, Podmore. Napoleon, Mr Goodbody. Jesus, Mr
27Doyle.
364 Shakespeares were as common as Murphies. What's in a name?


365
28 ⸢1[Of course,]Of course,Yes, to be sure,Yes, to be sure, 1⸣ [Of course,]Of course,Yes, to be sure,Yes, to be sure, Mr Bloom ⸢1
29[thoroughly agreed.]thoroughly agreed.unaffectedly concurred.unaffectedly concurred. 1⸣

29[thoroughly agreed.]thoroughly agreed.unaffectedly concurred.unaffectedly concurred.
Of course. Our name
366 was changed too⧼.⧽.,
30 he added, pushing the socalled roll across.


367
31The redbearded sailor who had his weather⸢3weather3⸣ eye on the newcomers
368
32boarded ⸢4[Stephen]StephenStephen, whom he had singled out for attention in
33particular,
Stephen, whom he had singled out for attention in
33particular,
4⸣
[Stephen]StephenStephen, whom he had singled out for attention in
33particular,
Stephen, whom he had singled out for attention in
33particular,

369 squarely by asking:


370
34And what might your name be?


371
1Just in the nick of time Mr Bloom touched his companion's boot but
372
2Stephen, apparently⧽apparently apparently⧽apparently apparently⸢4apparently4⸣ disregarding the warm ⸢4[pressure
3apparently

3apparently
,]
pressure
3apparently

3apparently
,
pressure from an unexpected
373quarter,
pressure from an unexpected
373quarter,
4⸣
[pressure
3apparently

3apparently
,]
pressure
3apparently

3apparently
,
pressure from an unexpected
373quarter,
pressure from an unexpected
373quarter,
answered:


374
4Dedalus.


375
5The sailor stared at him heavily from a pair of drowsy ⸢3[eyes.]eyes.baggy
6eyes,
376rather bunged up from excessive use of⸢4use of4⸣ ⸢4[boose.]boose.boose, preferably
7good old
377Hollands and water.
boose, preferably
7good old
377Hollands and water.
4⸣
[boose.]boose.boose, preferably
7good old
377Hollands and water.
boose, preferably
7good old
377Hollands and water.
baggy
6eyes,
376rather bunged up from excessive use of⸢4use of4⸣ ⸢4[boose.]boose.boose, preferably
7good old
377Hollands and water.
boose, preferably
7good old
377Hollands and water.
4⸣
[boose.]boose.boose, preferably
7good old
377Hollands and water.
boose, preferably
7good old
377Hollands and water.
3⸣
[eyes.]eyes.baggy
6eyes,
376rather bunged up from excessive use of⸢4use of4⸣ ⸢4[boose.]boose.boose, preferably
7good old
377Hollands and water.
boose, preferably
7good old
377Hollands and water.
4⸣
[boose.]boose.boose, preferably
7good old
377Hollands and water.
boose, preferably
7good old
377Hollands and water.
baggy
6eyes,
376rather bunged up from excessive use of⸢4use of4⸣ ⸢4[boose.]boose.boose, preferably
7good old
377Hollands and water.
boose, preferably
7good old
377Hollands and water.
4⸣
[boose.]boose.boose, preferably
7good old
377Hollands and water.
boose, preferably
7good old
377Hollands and water.


378
8You know Simon Dedalus⧼,⧽,? he asked at ⧼lenght⧽lenght length.


379
9I've heard of him, Stephen said.


380
10Mr Bloom was all at sea for a moment, seeing the others evidently
381 ⸢3[listening]listening
11 eavesdropping

11 eavesdropping
3⸣
[listening]listening
11 eavesdropping

11 eavesdropping
too too too too .


382
12He's Irish, the sailor said⧽sailor said seaman bold⸢4bold4⸣ affirmed seaman bold⸢4bold4⸣ affirmed sailor said⧽sailor said seaman bold⸢4bold4⸣ affirmed seaman bold⸢4bold4⸣ affirmed , staring still in
13 much the same way
383 and nodding. All Irish.


384
14All too Irish, Stephen rejoined.


385
15As for Mr Bloom he could neither make head or tail of the whole⸢1whole1⸣
386
16 business and he was just asking himself what possible connection when the
387
17sailor of his own accord turned to the others in⧽others in other occupants of other occupants of others in⧽others in other occupants of other occupants of the
18 shelter with
388 the remark:


389
19I seen him shoot two eggs off two bottles at fifty yards over his shoulder.
390
20 The lefthand dead shot.


391
21Though he was slightly hampered by an occasional stammer and his
392
22 gestures being also clumsy as it was as it was still he did his best to explain.


393
23Bottles out there, say. Fifty yards measured. Eggs on the bottles. Cocks
394
24 his gun over his shoulder. Aims.


395
25He turned his body half round, shut up his right eye completely. Then
396
26 he screwed his features up someway sideways and glared out into the night
397
27 with an unprepossessing ⸢3[eye.]eye. cast of countenance. cast of countenance. 3⸣ [eye.]eye. cast of countenance. cast of countenance.


398
28Pom! he then shouted once.


399
29The entire audience waited, anticipating ⸢1[a still further]a still further an
30additional
an
30additional
1⸣
[a still further]a still further an
30additional
an
30additional
⧼dem⧽dem detonation,
400 there being still⸢1still1⸣ a ⸢B[second]second further further B⸣ [second]second further further egg.


401
31Pom! he shouted twice.

⸢4


402
32Egg two evidently demolished, he nodded and winked, adding
403
33 bloodthirstilybloodthirstily:


404
34
Buffalo Bill shoots to kill,

405
35
Never missed nor he never will.


406
36 A silence ensued till Mr Bloom for agreeableness' sake justjust ⸢4[asked]asked
37 felt like
407asking him

37 felt like
407asking him
4⸣
[asked]asked
37 felt like
407asking him

37 felt like
407asking him
whether it was for a marksmanship ⸢3[competition.]competition.
38 competition like the Bisley.

38 competition like the Bisley.
3⸣
[competition.]competition.
38 competition like the Bisley.

38 competition like the Bisley.


408
1Beg pardon, the sailor said.


409
2Long ago? Mr Bloom ⸢2[pursued.]pursued.pursued without ⸢3[flinching.]flinching.flinching
3a hairsbreadth.
flinching
3a hairsbreadth.
3⸣
[flinching.]flinching.flinching
3a hairsbreadth.
flinching
3a hairsbreadth.
pursued without ⸢3[flinching.]flinching.flinching
3a hairsbreadth.
flinching
3a hairsbreadth.
3⸣
[flinching.]flinching.flinching
3a hairsbreadth.
flinching
3a hairsbreadth.
2⸣
[pursued.]pursued.pursued without ⸢3[flinching.]flinching.flinching
3a hairsbreadth.
flinching
3a hairsbreadth.
3⸣
[flinching.]flinching.flinching
3a hairsbreadth.
flinching
3a hairsbreadth.
pursued without ⸢3[flinching.]flinching.flinching
3a hairsbreadth.
flinching
3a hairsbreadth.
3⸣
[flinching.]flinching.flinching
3a hairsbreadth.
flinching
3a hairsbreadth.


410
4Why, the sailor replied, relaxing to a certain ⸢3[extent,]extent, extent under the
5magic
411influence of diamond cut diamond,
extent under the
5magic
411influence of diamond cut diamond,
3⸣
[extent,]extent, extent under the
5magic
411influence of diamond cut diamond,
extent under the
5magic
411influence of diamond cut diamond,
it might be a matter of ten years.
6 He
412 toured the wide world with Hengler's Royal Circus. I seen him do that
7 in
413 Stockholm.


414
8Curious coincidence, Mr Bloom confided to Stephen unobtrusively.


415
9Murphy's my name, the sailor continued. D. B. Murphy of Carrigaloe.
416
10 Know where that is?


417
11Queenstown harbour, Stephen replied.


418
12That's right, the sailor said. Fort Camden and Fort Carlisle.⸢2Fort Camden and Fort Carlisle.2⸣ That's
13 where
419 I hails from.
That's
13 where
419 I hails from.
I belongs there. That's where I hails from. My little
14 woman's
420 down there. She's waiting for me, I know. For England, home
15 and beauty.

421She's my own true wife I haven't seen for seven years⧼.⧽. now,
16 sailing about.


422
17Mr Bloom could easily picture his advent on this scene, the
423
18homecoming to the mariner's roadside shieling.⧽shieling. shieling after having
19diddled Davy
424Jones,
⸢1after having
19diddled Davy
424Jones,1⸣
a rainy night with a blind moon.
shieling after having
19diddled Davy
424Jones,
⸢1after having
19diddled Davy
424Jones,1⸣
a rainy night with a blind moon.
shieling.⧽shieling. shieling after having
19diddled Davy
424Jones,
⸢1after having
19diddled Davy
424Jones,1⸣
a rainy night with a blind moon.
shieling after having
19diddled Davy
424Jones,
⸢1after having
19diddled Davy
424Jones,1⸣
a rainy night with a blind moon.
Across the world
20for a wife.
⸢2Across the world
20for a wife.2⸣
Quite a
425 number of stories there were on that particular Alice
21Ben Bolt
⸢1Alice
21Ben Bolt1⸣
topic, Enoch
426 Arden and Rip van Winkle and does anybody
22 hereabouts remember Caoc
427 O'Leary, a favourite and most tryingand most trying
23 declamation piece by the way of poor
428 John ⸢B[Casey.]Casey. Casey and a bit of
24perfect poetry in its own small⸢4own small4⸣ way.
Casey and a bit of
24perfect poetry in its own small⸢4own small4⸣ way.
B⸣
[Casey.]Casey. Casey and a bit of
24perfect poetry in its own small⸢4own small4⸣ way.
Casey and a bit of
24perfect poetry in its own small⸢4own small4⸣ way.
Never about
429 the runaway wife
25 coming back, however muchmuch devoted to ⸢3[him.]him. the absentee. the absentee. 3⸣ [him.]him. the absentee. the absentee. The
430 face at
26 the ⸢3[window when]window when window! Judge of his astonishment when he finally
27did breast
431the tape and
window! Judge of his astonishment when he finally
27did breast
431the tape and
3⸣
[window when]window when window! Judge of his astonishment when he finally
27did breast
431the tape and
window! Judge of his astonishment when he finally
27did breast
431the tape and
the awful truth dawned upon him.⧽him. ⸢B[him,]him, him
28ab⧽

28ab
anent his better half,
him
28ab⧽

28ab
anent his better half,
B⸣
[him,]him, him
28ab⧽

28ab
anent his better half,
him
28ab⧽

28ab
anent his better half,

432 wrecked in his affections.
⸢B[him,]him, him
28ab⧽

28ab
anent his better half,
him
28ab⧽

28ab
anent his better half,
B⸣
[him,]him, him
28ab⧽

28ab
anent his better half,
him
28ab⧽

28ab
anent his better half,

432 wrecked in his affections.
him.⧽him. ⸢B[him,]him, him
28ab⧽

28ab
anent his better half,
him
28ab⧽

28ab
anent his better half,
B⸣
[him,]him, him
28ab⧽

28ab
anent his better half,
him
28ab⧽

28ab
anent his better half,

432 wrecked in his affections.
⸢B[him,]him, him
28ab⧽

28ab
anent his better half,
him
28ab⧽

28ab
anent his better half,
B⸣
[him,]him, him
28ab⧽

28ab
anent his better half,
him
28ab⧽

28ab
anent his better half,

432 wrecked in his affections.
You little expected me
29 but I've come to stay and
433 make a fresh start. There she sits, a grasswidow,
30 at the selfsameselfsame fireside.
434 Believes me dead, rocked in the cradle of the deep.
31 And there sits ⸢4[uncle,]uncle, uncle
435Chubb⧼,⧽, or Tomkin, as the case might be,
uncle
435Chubb⧼,⧽, or Tomkin, as the case might be,
4⸣
[uncle,]uncle, uncle
435Chubb⧼,⧽, or Tomkin, as the case might be,
uncle
435Chubb⧼,⧽, or Tomkin, as the case might be,

32 the publican of the Crown and
436 Anchor, in shirtsleeves, eating rumpsteak
33 and onions. No chair for father.No chair for father.
437Broo! The wind! Her brandnew
34 arrival is on her knee, postmortem child.
438 With a high ⸢B[ro]ro ro! ro! B⸣ [ro]ro ro! ro! and a
35 randy ⸢B[ro]ro ro! ro! B⸣ [ro]ro ro! ro! and my galloping tearing tandy, ⸢B[O.]O. O! O! B⸣ [O.]O. O! O! Bow to
439 the
36 inevitable.
Bow to
439 the
36 inevitable.
Grin and bear it. I remain with much lovewith much love your
440
37 brokenhearted husband D B Murphy.


441
1The sailor, who scarcely seemed to be a Dublin resident, turned to
442
2 one of the jarvies with the request:


443
3You don't happen to have such a thing as a spare chaw about you?


444
4The jarvey addressed as it happened had not but the keeper took a die
445
5 of plug from his good jacket hanging on a nail and it⧽it the desired⸢3desired3⸣
6 object
the desired⸢3desired3⸣
6 object
it⧽it the desired⸢3desired3⸣
6 object
the desired⸢3desired3⸣
6 object
was
446 passed from hand to hand.


447
7Thank you, the sailor said.


448
8He deposited the quid in his gob and, chewing and with some slow
449
9 stammers, proceeded:


450
10We come up this morning eleven o'clock. The threemaster Rosevean
451
11 from Bridgwater with bricks. I shipped to get over. Paid off this afternoon.
452
12 There's my discharge. See? D. B. Murphy. A. B. S.


453
13In confirmation of ⸢2[his]hiswhichwhich 2⸣ [his]hiswhichwhich statement he extricated from an
14 inside
454 pocket and handed to his neighbour a not very cleanlooking folded
455
15 document.


456
16You must have seen a fair share of the world, the keeper remarked,
457
17 leaning on the counter.


458
18Why, the sailor answered upon reflection upon it, I've circumnavigated a
459
19 bit since I first joined on. I was in the Red Sea. I was in China and North
460
20 America and South America. We was chased by pirates one time.⧽time.
21voyage.

21voyage.
time.⧽time.
21voyage.

21voyage.
I seen
461 icebergs plenty, growlers. I was in Stockholm and the Black
22 Sea, the
462Dardanelles under Captain Dalton, the best bloody man that ever
23 scuttled a
463 ship. I seen Russia. Gospodi pomilyou. That's how the Russians
24 prays.


464
25You seen queer sights, don't be talking, ⸢4[said]said put in put in 4⸣ [said]said put in put in a jarvey.


465
26Why, the sailor said, shifting his partially chewed plug. I seen queer
466
27 things too, ups and downs. I seen a crocodile bite the fluke of an anchor
467
28 same as I chew that quid.


468
29He took out of his mouth the pulpy quid and, lodging it between his
469
30 teeth, bit ferociously:


470
31Khaan! Like that. And I seen maneaters in Peru that eats corpses and the
471
32 livers of horses. Look here. Here they are. A friend of mine sent me.


472
33He fumbled out a picture postcard from his inside pocket which
473
34 seemed to be in its way a species of repository and pushed it along the table.
474
35 The printed matter on it stated: Choza de Indios. Beni, Bolivia.


475
36All focussed their attention at the scene exhibited, ⸢1the scene exhibited, 1⸣ a group of
37 savage
476 women in striped loincloths, squatted, blinking, suckling, frowning,
477
1sleeping amid a swarm of infants (there must have been quite a score of
478
2 them) outside some primitive ⸢3[huts]huts shanties shanties 3⸣ [huts]huts shanties shanties of osier.


479
3Chews coca all day, the communicative ⸢1[sailor]sailor tarpaulin tarpaulin 1⸣ [sailor]sailor tarpaulin tarpaulin added.
4 Stomachs like
480breadgraters. Cuts off their diddies when they can't bear
5 no more children.
481 See them sitting there stark ballocknaked eating a dead
6 horse's liver raw.


482
7His postcard proved a centre of attraction for Messrs the
8greenhorns
⸢4for Messrs the
8greenhorns4⸣

483 for several minutes if not more.


484
9Know how to keep them off? he inquired generally.


485
10Nobody volunteering a statement he winked, saying:


486
11Glass. That boggles 'em. Glass.


487
12Mr Bloom, without evincing surprise, unostentatiously turned over
488
13 the card to see⧽see peruse peruse see⧽see peruse peruse the partially obliterated address and postmark. It
14 ran as
489 follows: Tarjeta Postal, Señor A Boudin, Galeria Becche, Santiago,
15 Chile.

490 There was no 🕮 message evidently, as he took particular notice.


491
16Though not an implicit believer in the lurid story narrated (or the
492
17eggsniping transaction for that matter despite William Tell and the
493
18Lazarillo‐Don Cesar de Bazan incident depicted in Maritana on which
494
19occasion the former's ball went⧽went passed passed went⧽went passed passed through the latter's hat)
⸢1(or the
492
17eggsniping transaction for that matter despite William Tell and the
493
18Lazarillo‐Don Cesar de Bazan incident depicted in Maritana on which
494
19occasion the former's ball went⧽went passed passed went⧽went passed passed through the latter's hat)1⸣
having
20 detected a
495 discrepancy between his ⸢2[name, assuming]name, assuming name (assuming name (assuming 2⸣ [name, assuming]name, assuming name (assuming name (assuming
21 he was the person he represented
496himself to ⸢2[be,]be,be and not sailing under
22false colours⧼,⧽, after having boxed the
497compass on the strict q.t.
23somewhere)
be and not sailing under
22false colours⧼,⧽, after having boxed the
497compass on the strict q.t.
23somewhere)
2⸣
[be,]be,be and not sailing under
22false colours⧼,⧽, after having boxed the
497compass on the strict q.t.
23somewhere)
be and not sailing under
22false colours⧼,⧽, after having boxed the
497compass on the strict q.t.
23somewhere)
and the fictitious addressee of the
498 missive which made him
24nourish some suspicions of our friend's bona fides
⸢1which made him
24nourish some suspicions of our friend's bona fides 1⸣

499 nevertheless it reminded
25 him in a way of a longcherished plan he meant to
500 one day realise some
26Wednesday or Saturday
⸢3some
26Wednesday or Saturday3⸣
of travelling to London via
501 long sea ⸢3[for]for not to
27say that he had ever travelled extensively to any great extent
502but
not to
27say that he had ever travelled extensively to any great extent
502but
3⸣
[for]for not to
27say that he had ever travelled extensively to any great extent
502but
not to
27say that he had ever travelled extensively to any great extent
502but
he was at
28 heart a born adventurer though by a trick of fate he had
503 consistently
29 remained a landlubber except you call going to Holyhead
504 which was his
30 longest. Martin Cunningham frequently said he would work
505 a pass through
31 Egan but some deuced⸢2deuced2⸣ hitch or other eternally cropped up
506 with the net
32 result that the scheme fell through. But even suppose it did
507 come to
33 planking down the needful⸢2the needful2⸣ and breaking Boyd's heart it was not so
508 dear,
34 purse permitting, a few guineas at the outside considering the fare to
509
35 Mullingar where he figured on going⸢Bwhere he figured on goingB⸣ was five and six, there and back.
36 The
510 trip would benefit health on account of the bracing ozone and be in
1 every
511 way thoroughly ⸢1[pleasurable]pleasurable pleasurable, especially for a chap
2whose liver was out of
512order,
pleasurable, especially for a chap
2whose liver was out of
512order,
1⸣
[pleasurable]pleasurable pleasurable, especially for a chap
2whose liver was out of
512order,
pleasurable, especially for a chap
2whose liver was out of
512order,
seeing the different places along the route,
3 Plymouth, Falmouth,
513 Southampton and so on culminating in an
4 instructive tour of the sights of
514 the great metropolis, the spectacle of our⸢Bthe spectacle of ourB⸣
5 modern ⸢3[Babylon,]Babylon, Babylon where doubtless
515he would see ⧼a⧽a the greatest
6improvement,
Babylon where doubtless
515he would see ⧼a⧽a the greatest
6improvement,
3⸣
[Babylon,]Babylon, Babylon where doubtless
515he would see ⧼a⧽a the greatest
6improvement,
Babylon where doubtless
515he would see ⧼a⧽a the greatest
6improvement,
tower, abbey, wealth of Park lane to
516 renew acquaintance
7 with. Another thing just struck him as a⸢1a1⸣ by no means
517 [1 a] a bad notion was
8 he might have a gaze around on the spot to see about trying
518 to make
9 arrangements about a concert tour of summer music⸢1of summer music1⸣ embracing the
519 ⸢1[chief]chief
10 most prominent

10 most prominent
1⸣
[chief]chief
10 most prominent

10 most prominent
pleasure resorts, Margate with mixed bathing
11and firstrate⸢3firstrate3⸣
520hydros ⧼an⧽an and spas, ⸢3[Falmouth, Plymouth]Falmouth, Plymouth Eastbourne,
12Scarborough, Margate
Eastbourne,
12Scarborough, Margate
3⸣
[Falmouth, Plymouth]Falmouth, Plymouth Eastbourne,
12Scarborough, Margate
Eastbourne,
12Scarborough, Margate
⸢1with mixed bathing
11and firstrate⸢3firstrate3⸣
520hydros ⧼an⧽an and spas, ⸢3[Falmouth, Plymouth]Falmouth, Plymouth Eastbourne,
12Scarborough, Margate
Eastbourne,
12Scarborough, Margate
3⸣
[Falmouth, Plymouth]Falmouth, Plymouth Eastbourne,
12Scarborough, Margate
Eastbourne,
12Scarborough, Margate
1⸣
and so ⸢B[on.]on. on, ⧼B⧽B beautiful
521 ⸢1[Bournemouth]Bournemouth
13Bournemouth, the Channel islands

13Bournemouth, the Channel islands
1⸣
[Bournemouth]Bournemouth
13Bournemouth, the Channel islands

13Bournemouth, the Channel islands
and similar bijou spots, which might
522
14prove highly remunerative.
on, ⧼B⧽B beautiful
521 ⸢1[Bournemouth]Bournemouth
13Bournemouth, the Channel islands

13Bournemouth, the Channel islands
1⸣
[Bournemouth]Bournemouth
13Bournemouth, the Channel islands

13Bournemouth, the Channel islands
and similar bijou spots, which might
522
14prove highly remunerative.
B⸣
[on.]on. on, ⧼B⧽B beautiful
521 ⸢1[Bournemouth]Bournemouth
13Bournemouth, the Channel islands

13Bournemouth, the Channel islands
1⸣
[Bournemouth]Bournemouth
13Bournemouth, the Channel islands

13Bournemouth, the Channel islands
and similar bijou spots, which might
522
14prove highly remunerative.
on, ⧼B⧽B beautiful
521 ⸢1[Bournemouth]Bournemouth
13Bournemouth, the Channel islands

13Bournemouth, the Channel islands
1⸣
[Bournemouth]Bournemouth
13Bournemouth, the Channel islands

13Bournemouth, the Channel islands
and similar bijou spots, which might
522
14prove highly remunerative.
Not, of course, with a hole and corner scratch
523 ⸢4[company,]company,
15 company or local ladies on the job,

15 company or local ladies on the job,
4⸣
[company,]company,
15 company or local ladies on the job,

15 company or local ladies on the job,
witness Mrs C P M‘Coy
16type lend me
524 your valise and I'll post you the ticket. No, something top
17 notch, an all star
525 Irish caste, the Tweedy‐Flower grand opera company
18with his own legal
526consort as leading lady
⸢1
18with his own legal
526consort as leading lady1⸣
as a sort of counterblast to the
19Elster Grimes and
527Moody‐Manners,
⸢Bthe Tweedy‐Flower grand opera company
18with his own legal
526consort as leading lady
⸢1
18with his own legal
526consort as leading lady1⸣
as a sort of counterblast to the
19Elster Grimes and
527Moody‐Manners,B⸣
perfectly simple matter and he was
20quite sanguine of
528success,
⸢4and he was
20quite sanguine of
528success,4⸣
providing puffs in the local papers could be
21 managed by some
529fellow with a bit of bounce⸢4with a bit of bounce4⸣ who could pull the
22indispensable wires
⸢1by some
529fellow with a bit of bounce⸢4with a bit of bounce4⸣ who could pull the
22indispensable wires 1⸣
and thus
530 combine business with pleasure. But who?
23That was the rub.
⸢1But who?
23That was the rub.1⸣


531
24 ⸢2[Also]AlsoAlso, without being actually⸢3actually3⸣ positive,Also, without being actually⸢3actually3⸣ positive, 2⸣ [Also]AlsoAlso, without being actually⸢3actually3⸣ positive,Also, without being actually⸢3actually3⸣ positive, it struck him a great
25 field was to
532 be opened up in the line of opening up new routes to keep pace
26with the
533times
⸢3to keep pace
26with the
533times3⸣
apropos of the Fishguard‐Rosslare route which, it was
27mooted, was
534 once more on the tapis in the circumlocution departments
28 with the usual
535 quantity of red tape and⸢B quantity of red tape andB⸣ dillydallying of effete fogeydom
29 and dunderheads
536 generally. A great opportunity there certainly was for
30 push and enterprise
537 to meet the travelling needs of the public at large, the
31 average man, i.e.
538 Brown, Robinson and ⸢B[so forth.]so forth. Co. Co. B⸣ [so forth.]so forth. Co. Co.


539
32It was a subject of regret and absurd as well on the face of it and no
540
33 small blame to our vaunted society that the man in the ⸢3[street ]street street, street, 3⸣ [street ]street street, street,
34Brown, Robinson and Co,⧽

34Brown, Robinson and Co,
⸢B
34Brown, Robinson and Co,⧽

34Brown, Robinson and Co,
B⸣
when the
541system really needed toning up,
⸢3when the
541system really needed toning up,3⸣

35 for the matter of a couple of paltry pounds
542 was debarred from seeing more
36 of the world they lived in instead of being
543 always and ever cooped up since
1 my old stick‐in‐the‐mud took me for a
544 wife. After ⸢1[all]all all, hang it, all, hang it, 1⸣ [all]all all, hang it, all, hang it, they
2 had their eleven and more humdrum months of
545 it and merited a radical
3 change of venue after the grind of city life⸢1after the grind of city life1⸣ in the
546summertime for choice
4 when dame Nature is at her spectacular⸢1spectacular1⸣ best
547 constituting nothing short of
5 a new lease of life. There were equally
548excellent opportunities for
6 vacationists
for
6 vacationists
in the home island,
⸢1equally
548excellent opportunities for
6 vacationists
for
6 vacationists
in the home island,1⸣
delightful sylvan
549 spots for ⸢B[rejuvenation]rejuvenation
7 rejuvenation, offering a plethora of attractions⧼,⧽, as well as
8a bracing
550tonic for the system

7 rejuvenation, offering a plethora of attractions⧼,⧽, as well as
8a bracing
550tonic for the system
B⸣
[rejuvenation]rejuvenation
7 rejuvenation, offering a plethora of attractions⧼,⧽, as well as
8a bracing
550tonic for the system

7 rejuvenation, offering a plethora of attractions⧼,⧽, as well as
8a bracing
550tonic for the system
in and around Dublin and its
9picturesque

9picturesque
environs
⸢4and its
9picturesque

9picturesque
environs 4⸣

551even, Poulaphouca to which there was a
10steamtram, but also farther away
552 from the madding crowd in Wicklow,
11 rightly termed the garden of Ireland,
553 an ideal neighbourhood for elderly ⸢4[wheelmen,]wheelmen,
12 wheelmen so long as it didn't come
554down,

12 wheelmen so long as it didn't come
554down,
4⸣
[wheelmen,]wheelmen,
12 wheelmen so long as it didn't come
554down,

12 wheelmen so long as it didn't come
554down,
⸢3 an ideal neighbourhood for elderly ⸢4[wheelmen,]wheelmen,
12 wheelmen so long as it didn't come
554down,

12 wheelmen so long as it didn't come
554down,
4⸣
[wheelmen,]wheelmen,
12 wheelmen so long as it didn't come
554down,

12 wheelmen so long as it didn't come
554down,
3⸣
and in the wilds
13 of ⸢B[Donegal,]Donegal, Donegal where Donegal where B⸣ [Donegal,]Donegal, Donegal where Donegal where if report spoke ⸢B[true,]true, true the coup d'œil
555
14 was exceedingly grand
true the coup d'œil
555
14 was exceedingly grand
B⸣
[true,]true, true the coup d'œil
555
14 was exceedingly grand
true the coup d'œil
555
14 was exceedingly grand
though the lastnamed locality was⸢Bthe lastnamed locality wasB⸣ not easily
556 ⸢3[getatable. ]getatable.
15 getatable so that the influx of visitors was not as yet all that⸢4that4⸣
16it might be⧼.⧽.
557considering the signal benefits to be derived from ⸢4[it.]it. it while
17Howth with its
558historic associations and otherwise, Silken Thomas, Grace
18O'Malley,
559George IV, rhododendrons several hundred feet above sealevel
19was a
560favourite haunt with all sorts and conditions of men especially in the
20spring
561when young men's fancy, though it had its own toll of deaths by
21 falling off
562 the cliffs by design or accidentally, usually, by the way, on their
22 left leg,
though it had its own toll of deaths by
21 falling off
562 the cliffs by design or accidentally, usually, by the way, on their
22 left leg,
it
563being only about three quarters of an hour's run from the
23pillar.
it while
17Howth with its
558historic associations and otherwise, Silken Thomas, Grace
18O'Malley,
559George IV, rhododendrons several hundred feet above sealevel
19was a
560favourite haunt with all sorts and conditions of men especially in the
20spring
561when young men's fancy, though it had its own toll of deaths by
21 falling off
562 the cliffs by design or accidentally, usually, by the way, on their
22 left leg,
though it had its own toll of deaths by
21 falling off
562 the cliffs by design or accidentally, usually, by the way, on their
22 left leg,
it
563being only about three quarters of an hour's run from the
23pillar.
4⸣
[it.]it. it while
17Howth with its
558historic associations and otherwise, Silken Thomas, Grace
18O'Malley,
559George IV, rhododendrons several hundred feet above sealevel
19was a
560favourite haunt with all sorts and conditions of men especially in the
20spring
561when young men's fancy, though it had its own toll of deaths by
21 falling off
562 the cliffs by design or accidentally, usually, by the way, on their
22 left leg,
though it had its own toll of deaths by
21 falling off
562 the cliffs by design or accidentally, usually, by the way, on their
22 left leg,
it
563being only about three quarters of an hour's run from the
23pillar.
it while
17Howth with its
558historic associations and otherwise, Silken Thomas, Grace
18O'Malley,
559George IV, rhododendrons several hundred feet above sealevel
19was a
560favourite haunt with all sorts and conditions of men especially in the
20spring
561when young men's fancy, though it had its own toll of deaths by
21 falling off
562 the cliffs by design or accidentally, usually, by the way, on their
22 left leg,
though it had its own toll of deaths by
21 falling off
562 the cliffs by design or accidentally, usually, by the way, on their
22 left leg,
it
563being only about three quarters of an hour's run from the
23pillar.

15 getatable so that the influx of visitors was not as yet all that⸢4that4⸣
16it might be⧼.⧽.
557considering the signal benefits to be derived from ⸢4[it.]it. it while
17Howth with its
558historic associations and otherwise, Silken Thomas, Grace
18O'Malley,
559George IV, rhododendrons several hundred feet above sealevel
19was a
560favourite haunt with all sorts and conditions of men especially in the
20spring
561when young men's fancy, though it had its own toll of deaths by
21 falling off
562 the cliffs by design or accidentally, usually, by the way, on their
22 left leg,
though it had its own toll of deaths by
21 falling off
562 the cliffs by design or accidentally, usually, by the way, on their
22 left leg,
it
563being only about three quarters of an hour's run from the
23pillar.
it while
17Howth with its
558historic associations and otherwise, Silken Thomas, Grace
18O'Malley,
559George IV, rhododendrons several hundred feet above sealevel
19was a
560favourite haunt with all sorts and conditions of men especially in the
20spring
561when young men's fancy, though it had its own toll of deaths by
21 falling off
562 the cliffs by design or accidentally, usually, by the way, on their
22 left leg,
though it had its own toll of deaths by
21 falling off
562 the cliffs by design or accidentally, usually, by the way, on their
22 left leg,
it
563being only about three quarters of an hour's run from the
23pillar.
4⸣
[it.]it. it while
17Howth with its
558historic associations and otherwise, Silken Thomas, Grace
18O'Malley,
559George IV, rhododendrons several hundred feet above sealevel
19was a
560favourite haunt with all sorts and conditions of men especially in the
20spring
561when young men's fancy, though it had its own toll of deaths by
21 falling off
562 the cliffs by design or accidentally, usually, by the way, on their
22 left leg,
though it had its own toll of deaths by
21 falling off
562 the cliffs by design or accidentally, usually, by the way, on their
22 left leg,
it
563being only about three quarters of an hour's run from the
23pillar.
it while
17Howth with its
558historic associations and otherwise, Silken Thomas, Grace
18O'Malley,
559George IV, rhododendrons several hundred feet above sealevel
19was a
560favourite haunt with all sorts and conditions of men especially in the
20spring
561when young men's fancy, though it had its own toll of deaths by
21 falling off
562 the cliffs by design or accidentally, usually, by the way, on their
22 left leg,
though it had its own toll of deaths by
21 falling off
562 the cliffs by design or accidentally, usually, by the way, on their
22 left leg,
it
563being only about three quarters of an hour's run from the
23pillar.
3⸣
[getatable. ]getatable.
15 getatable so that the influx of visitors was not as yet all that⸢4that4⸣
16it might be⧼.⧽.
557considering the signal benefits to be derived from ⸢4[it.]it. it while
17Howth with its
558historic associations and otherwise, Silken Thomas, Grace
18O'Malley,
559George IV, rhododendrons several hundred feet above sealevel
19was a
560favourite haunt with all sorts and conditions of men especially in the
20spring
561when young men's fancy, though it had its own toll of deaths by
21 falling off
562 the cliffs by design or accidentally, usually, by the way, on their
22 left leg,
though it had its own toll of deaths by
21 falling off
562 the cliffs by design or accidentally, usually, by the way, on their
22 left leg,
it
563being only about three quarters of an hour's run from the
23pillar.
it while
17Howth with its
558historic associations and otherwise, Silken Thomas, Grace
18O'Malley,
559George IV, rhododendrons several hundred feet above sealevel
19was a
560favourite haunt with all sorts and conditions of men especially in the
20spring
561when young men's fancy, though it had its own toll of deaths by
21 falling off
562 the cliffs by design or accidentally, usually, by the way, on their
22 left leg,
though it had its own toll of deaths by
21 falling off
562 the cliffs by design or accidentally, usually, by the way, on their
22 left leg,
it
563being only about three quarters of an hour's run from the
23pillar.
4⸣
[it.]it. it while
17Howth with its
558historic associations and otherwise, Silken Thomas, Grace
18O'Malley,
559George IV, rhododendrons several hundred feet above sealevel
19was a
560favourite haunt with all sorts and conditions of men especially in the
20spring
561when young men's fancy, though it had its own toll of deaths by
21 falling off
562 the cliffs by design or accidentally, usually, by the way, on their
22 left leg,
though it had its own toll of deaths by
21 falling off
562 the cliffs by design or accidentally, usually, by the way, on their
22 left leg,
it
563being only about three quarters of an hour's run from the
23pillar.
it while
17Howth with its
558historic associations and otherwise, Silken Thomas, Grace
18O'Malley,
559George IV, rhododendrons several hundred feet above sealevel
19was a
560favourite haunt with all sorts and conditions of men especially in the
20spring
561when young men's fancy, though it had its own toll of deaths by
21 falling off
562 the cliffs by design or accidentally, usually, by the way, on their
22 left leg,
though it had its own toll of deaths by
21 falling off
562 the cliffs by design or accidentally, usually, by the way, on their
22 left leg,
it
563being only about three quarters of an hour's run from the
23pillar.

15 getatable so that the influx of visitors was not as yet all that⸢4that4⸣
16it might be⧼.⧽.
557considering the signal benefits to be derived from ⸢4[it.]it. it while
17Howth with its
558historic associations and otherwise, Silken Thomas, Grace
18O'Malley,
559George IV, rhododendrons several hundred feet above sealevel
19was a
560favourite haunt with all sorts and conditions of men especially in the
20spring
561when young men's fancy, though it had its own toll of deaths by
21 falling off
562 the cliffs by design or accidentally, usually, by the way, on their
22 left leg,
though it had its own toll of deaths by
21 falling off
562 the cliffs by design or accidentally, usually, by the way, on their
22 left leg,
it
563being only about three quarters of an hour's run from the
23pillar.
it while
17Howth with its
558historic associations and otherwise, Silken Thomas, Grace
18O'Malley,
559George IV, rhododendrons several hundred feet above sealevel
19was a
560favourite haunt with all sorts and conditions of men especially in the
20spring
561when young men's fancy, though it had its own toll of deaths by
21 falling off
562 the cliffs by design or accidentally, usually, by the way, on their
22 left leg,
though it had its own toll of deaths by
21 falling off
562 the cliffs by design or accidentally, usually, by the way, on their
22 left leg,
it
563being only about three quarters of an hour's run from the
23pillar.
4⸣
[it.]it. it while
17Howth with its
558historic associations and otherwise, Silken Thomas, Grace
18O'Malley,
559George IV, rhododendrons several hundred feet above sealevel
19was a
560favourite haunt with all sorts and conditions of men especially in the
20spring
561when young men's fancy, though it had its own toll of deaths by
21 falling off
562 the cliffs by design or accidentally, usually, by the way, on their
22 left leg,
though it had its own toll of deaths by
21 falling off
562 the cliffs by design or accidentally, usually, by the way, on their
22 left leg,
it
563being only about three quarters of an hour's run from the
23pillar.
it while
17Howth with its
558historic associations and otherwise, Silken Thomas, Grace
18O'Malley,
559George IV, rhododendrons several hundred feet above sealevel
19was a
560favourite haunt with all sorts and conditions of men especially in the
20spring
561when young men's fancy, though it had its own toll of deaths by
21 falling off
562 the cliffs by design or accidentally, usually, by the way, on their
22 left leg,
though it had its own toll of deaths by
21 falling off
562 the cliffs by design or accidentally, usually, by the way, on their
22 left leg,
it
563being only about three quarters of an hour's run from the
23pillar.
Because of
564 course uptodate tourist travelling was as yet merely in
24 its infancy, so to
565 speak, and the accommodation left much to be desired.
25 Interesting to
566fathom it seemed to him from a motive of curiosity, pure and
26 simple, was
567 whether it was the traffic that created the route or viceversa or
27 the two sides
568 in fact. He turned back the other side of the card, picture,
28 and passed it
569 along to Stephen.


570
29I seen a Chinese one time, related the doughty⸢3doughty3⸣ narrator, that had little
571
30 pills like putty and he put them in the water and they opened and every pill
572
31 was something different. One was a ship, another was a house, another was
573
32 a flower. Cooks rats in your soup, he appetisingly⸢3appetisingly3⸣ added, the chinks does.


574
33Possibly perceiving an expression of dubiosity on their faces the
575
34 globetrotter went on, adhering to his adventures.


576
35And I seen a man killed in Trieste by an Italian chap. Knife in his back.
577
36 Knife like that.


578
1Whilst speaking he produced a dangerouslooking claspknife quite in
579
2 keeping with his character and held it in the striking position.


580
3In a knockingshop it was count of a tryon between two smugglers.
4 Fellow
581 hid behind a door, come up behind him. Like that. Prepare to meet
5 your
582 God
, says he. Chuk! It went into his back up to the butt.


583
6The⧽

583
6The
His

583
6The⧽

583
6The
His
heavy glance drowsily roaming about kind of defied their
7 further
584 questions even should they by any chance want to.


585
8That's a good bit of steel, repeated he, examining his formidable ⸢1[knife.]knife.
9stiletto
.

9stiletto
.
1⸣
[knife.]knife.
9stiletto
.

9stiletto
.


586
10After which harrowing ⸢1[tale]tale dénouement sufficient to appal the
11stoutest
dénouement sufficient to appal the
11stoutest
1⸣
[tale]tale dénouement sufficient to appal the
11stoutest
dénouement sufficient to appal the
11stoutest
he
587 snapped the blade to and stowed the weapon in question away
12 as before in
588 his chamber of horrors, otherwise pocket.


589
13They're great for the cold steel, somebody who was evidently quite in the
590
14dark
⸢1who was evidently quite in the
590
14dark1⸣
said for the benefit of them all. That was why they thought the park
591
15 murders of the invincibles was done by foreigners on account of them using
592
16 ⧼knifes⧽knifes knives.


593
17At this remark passed obviously in the spirit of where ignorance is
594
18bliss
Mr B. and Stephen, each in his own particular way, both
19 instinctively
595 exchanged meaning glances, in a religious silence of the strictly
20 entre nous
596 variety however, towards where Skin‐the‐Goat, alias the
21 keeper, not
597 turning a hair, was drawing spurts of liquid from his boiler
22 affair. His
598 inscrutable face which was really a work of art, a perfect study
23 in itself,
599 beggaring description,⸢1 beggaring description,1⸣ conveyed the impression that he didn't
24 understand
600 one jot of what was going on. Funny, very!


601
25There ⸢3[followed]followed ensued ensued 3⸣ [followed]followed ensued ensued a somewhat lengthy pause. One man was
26 reading in fits
602 and starts a stained by coffee evening journal, another the
27 card with the
603 natives choza de, another the seaman's discharge. Mr Bloom,
28 so far as he
604 was personally⸢3personally3⸣ concerned, was just pondering in pensive
29 mood. He vividly
605 recollected when the occurrence alluded to took place as
30 well as yesterday,
606roughly some score of years previously ⧼when⧽when in the
31 days of the land troubles,
607when it took the civilised world by storm,
32 figuratively speaking, ⸢1[in eightyone]in eightyone early in the
608eighties, eightyone to be
33correct,
early in the
608eighties, eightyone to be
33correct,
1⸣
[in eightyone]in eightyone early in the
608eighties, eightyone to be
33correct,
early in the
608eighties, eightyone to be
33correct,
when he was just turned fifteen.
609


34Ay, boss, the sailor broke in. Give us back them papers.


610
35The request being complied with he clawed them up with a scrape.


611
36Have you seen the rock of Gibraltar? Mr Bloom ⸢3[asked.]asked. inquired. inquired. 3⸣ [asked.]asked. inquired. inquired.


612
1The sailor grimaced, chewing, in a way that might be read as read as yes,
2ay
613or no.


614
3Ah, you've touched there too, Mr Bloom said, Europa point, thinking he
615
4 had, in the hope that the rover might possibly by some ⸢1[reminiscences. But]reminiscences. But
5reminiscences but

5reminiscences but
1⸣
[reminiscences. But]reminiscences. But
5reminiscences but

5reminiscences but
he
616 failed to do so, simply letting spirt a jet of spew into
6 the sawdust, and shook
617 his head with a sort of lazy scorn.


618
7What year would that be about? Mr B interrogated. Can you recall the
619
8 boats?


620
9Our soi‐disant ⸢B soi‐disant B⸣ sailor munched heavily awhile hungrily before
621
10answering:


622
11I'm tired of all them rocks in the sea, he said, and boats and ships. Salt
623
12 junk all the time.


624
13Tired seemingly, he ceased. His questioner perceiving that he was not
625
14 likely to get a great deal of change out of such a wily old customer, fell to
626
15 woolgathering on the enormous dimensions of the water about the globe,
627
16 suffice it to say ⸢B[that]that that, as a casual glance at the map revealed, that, as a casual glance at the map revealed, B⸣ [that]that that, as a casual glance at the map revealed, that, as a casual glance at the map revealed, it
17 covered fully
628 three fourths of it and he fully realised accordingly what it
18meant to rule the
629 waves. On more than one occasion, a dozen at the
19lowest, near the North
630 Bull at Dollymount he had remarked a
20 superannuated old salt, evidently
631 derelict, seated habitually near the not
21 particularly redolent sea on the wall,
632 staring ⸢1[calmly]calmly quite obliviously quite obliviously 1⸣ [calmly]calmly quite obliviously quite obliviously at
22it and it at him⧼.⧽., dreaming of fresh woods and
633pastures ⸢2[new.]new.new as
23someone somewhere sings.
new as
23someone somewhere sings.
2⸣
[new.]new.new as
23someone somewhere sings.
new as
23someone somewhere sings.
And it left him wondering why.
634 Possibly he had
24 tried to find out the secret for himself, floundering up and
635 down the
25antipodes
⸢3the
25antipodes3⸣
and all that sort of thing and over and under, well, not
636 exactly
26under, tempting the fates. And the odds were twenty to nil⸢1twenty to nil1⸣ there was
637
27 really no secret about ⸢2[it.]it.it at all.it at all. 2⸣ [it.]it.it at all.it at all. ⸢1[Nevertheless]Nevertheless Nevertheless, without
28going into the minutiae
638of the business,
Nevertheless, without
28going into the minutiae
638of the business,
1⸣
[Nevertheless]Nevertheless Nevertheless, without
28going into the minutiae
638of the business,
Nevertheless, without
28going into the minutiae
638of the business,
the eloquent fact remained that the
29 sea was there in all its
639 glory and in the natural course of things somebody
30or other
⸢2
30or other2⸣
had to sail on it
640 and fly in the face of providence⸢4 and fly in the face of providence4⸣ though it
31 merely went to show how people
641 usually contrived to load that sort of onus
32 on to the other fellow like the hell
642 idea and the lottery and insurance which⸢3which3⸣
33 were run on identically the same
643 lines so that for that very reason if no
34other lifeboat Sunday was a highly
644 laudable institution to which the public
35 at large, no matter where living
645 inland or seaside, as the case might be,⸢1as the case might be,1⸣
36 having it brought home to them like
646that should extend its gratitude also to
1 the harbourmasters and coastguard
647 service who had to man the rigging and
2 push off and out amid the elements ⸢Bamid the elements B⸣
648whatever the season when duty
3 called Ireland expects that every man and so
649on
⸢1 Ireland expects that every man and so
649on1⸣
and sometimes had a
4 terrible time of it in the wintertime not forgetting
650 the Irish lights, Kish and
5 others, liable to capsize at any moment, ⸢3liable to capsize at any moment, 3⸣ rounding
651 which he once with his
6 daughter had experienced some remarkably choppy,
652 not to ⧼sto⧽sto say
7 stormy, weather.


653
8There was a fellow sailed with me in the Rover, the old seadog, himself
9 a
654 rover, proceeded, went ashore and took up a softsoft job as gentleman's
10 valet at
655 six quid a month. Them are his trousers I've on me and he gave me
11 an
656 oilskin and that jackknife. I'm game for that job, shaving and brushup. I
657
12 hate roaming about. There's my son now, Danny, run off to sea and his
658
13 mother got him took in a draper's in Cork where he could be drawing easy
659
14 money.


660
15What age is he? queried one hearer who, by the way, seen from the side,
661
16 bore a distant resemblance to Henry Campbell, the townclerk, away from
662
17 the carking⸢4carking4⸣ cares of office, unwashed of course and in a seedy getup and a
663
18 strong suspicion of ⸢1[nosepaint.]nosepaint. nosepaint about the nasal appendage. nosepaint about the nasal appendage. 1⸣ [nosepaint.]nosepaint. nosepaint about the nasal appendage. nosepaint about the nasal appendage.


664
19Why, the sailor answered with a slow puzzled utterance, my son, Danny?
665
20 He'd be about eighteen now, way I figure it.

⸢4[He]He
666
21 The Skibbereen father hereupon

666
21 The Skibbereen father hereupon
4⸣
[He]He
666
21 The Skibbereen father hereupon

666
21 The Skibbereen father hereupon
tore open his grey or
22 unclean
667 anyhow shirt with his two hands and scratched away at his chest
23 on which
668 was to be seen an image tattooed in blue Chinese ink intended to
24 represent
669 an anchor.


670
25There was lice in that bunk in Bridgwater, he remarked, sure as nuts. I
671
26 must get a wash tomorrow or next day. It's them black lads I objects to. I
672
27 hate those buggers. Suck your blood dry, they does.


673
28Seeing they were all looking at his chest he accommodatingly
29 dragged
674 his shirt more open so that on top of the timehonoured symbol of
30 the
675 mariner's hope and rest they had a full view of the figure 16 and a
31 young
676 man's sideface looking frowningly rather⧼.⧽..


677
32Tattoo, the exhibitor explained. That was done when we were lying
678
33 becalmed off Odessa in the Black Sea under Captain ⸢1[Dalton, best bloody
34man ever scuttled a ship.]
Dalton, best bloody
34man ever scuttled a ship.
Dalton. Dalton. 1⸣
[Dalton, best bloody
34man ever scuttled a ship.]
Dalton, best bloody
34man ever scuttled a ship.
Dalton. Dalton.
Fellow, the
679 name of Antonio, done that.
35 There he is himself, a Greek.


680
36Did it hurt much doing it? one asked the sailor.


681
1That worthy, however, was busily engaged in collecting round the.
682
2 Someway in his. Squeezing or.


683
3See here, he said, showing Antonio. There he is cursing the mate. And
684
4 there he is now, he added, the same fellow, pulling the skin with his
5fingers,
685 some special knack evidently, and he laughing at a yarn.


686
6And in point of fact the young man named Antonio's livid face did
687
7 actually look like forced smiling and the curious effect excited
8 the
688 ⸢1[unaffected]unaffected unreserved unreserved 1⸣ [unaffected]unaffected unreserved unreserved admiration of everybody including
9Skin‐the‐Goat, who this
689 time stretched over.


690
10Ay, ay, sighed the sailor, looking down on his manly chest. He's gone
691
11 too. Ate by sharks⧼.⧽. after. Ay, ay.


692
12He let go of the skin so that the profile resumed the normal expression
693
13 of before.


694
14Neat bit of work, one longshoreman⸢3longshoreman3⸣ said.


695
15And what's the number for? ⸢B[another]another loafer number two loafer number two B⸣ [another]another loafer number two loafer number two ⸢1[said. ]said.
16queried.

16queried.
1⸣
[said. ]said.
16queried.

16queried.


696
17Eaten alive? a ⸢1[third.]third. third asked the sailor. third asked the sailor. 1⸣ [third.]third. third asked the sailor. third asked the sailor.


697
18Ay, ay, sighed again the ⸢1[sailor,]sailor, latter personage, latter personage, 1⸣ [sailor,]sailor, latter personage, latter personage, more cheerily this
19time with
698 some sort of a half smile for a brief duration only in the
20 direction
in the
20 direction
of the
699 questioner about the number. Ate. A Greek he was.

|4 |
700
21And then he added with rather gallowsbird humour considering his
701
22 alleged end:


702 |4 |
23
⸢4
234⸣
 As bad as old Antonio,


703 |4 |
24  ⸢4[ for ] for For For 4⸣ [ for ] for For For he left me on my ownio.


704
25The face of a streetwalker glazed and haggard under a black straw
705
26hat peered askew round the door of the ⸢B[shelter.]shelter. shelter palpably
27reconnoitring on
706her own with the object of bringing more grist to her
28mill.
shelter palpably
27reconnoitring on
706her own with the object of bringing more grist to her
28mill.
B⸣
[shelter.]shelter. shelter palpably
27reconnoitring on
706her own with the object of bringing more grist to her
28mill.
shelter palpably
27reconnoitring on
706her own with the object of bringing more grist to her
28mill.
Mr ⸢4[Bloom]Bloom Bloom,
707scarcely knowing which way to look,
Bloom,
707scarcely knowing which way to look,
4⸣
[Bloom]Bloom Bloom,
707scarcely knowing which way to look,
Bloom,
707scarcely knowing which way to look,
turned
29 away on the moment
708 flusterfied but outwardly calm,flusterfied but outwardly calm, and, picking up
30 from the table the pink sheet
709 of the Abbey street organ which the jarvey, if
31 such he was, had laid aside,
710 he picked it up and looked at the pink⧼.⧽. of the
32 paper though why pink. His
711 reason for so doing was he recognised on the
33 moment round the door the
712 same face he ⸢B[met]met had caught a fleeting
34glimpse of
had caught a fleeting
34glimpse of
B⸣
[met]met had caught a fleeting
34glimpse of
had caught a fleeting
34glimpse of
that afternoon on Ormond
713quay, the partially idiotic⸢Bpartially idioticB⸣ female,
35 namely, of the lane who knew the lady in
714 the brown costume does be with
36 you (Mrs B.) and begged the chance of his
715 washing. Also why washing
1 which seemed rather vague than not, your
716washing. Still candour
2 compelled him to admit he had washed his wife's
717 undergarments when
3 soiled in Holles street and women would and did too
718 a man's similar
4 garments initialled with Bewley and Draper's marking ink
719(hers were, that
5is)
⸢2initialled with Bewley and Draper's marking ink
719(hers were, that
5is)2⸣
if they really loved him, that is to say, love me, love my
720 dirty shirt. Still
6 just ⸢3[then]then then, being on tenterhooks, then, being on tenterhooks, 3⸣ [then]then then, being on tenterhooks, then, being on tenterhooks, he desired the female's
721 room more
7 than her company so it came as a genuine relief when the keeper
722 made her a
8 rude sign to take herself off. Round the side of the Evening
723 Telegraph
he
9 just caught a fleetingfleeting glimpse of her face round the side of the
724 door with a
10 kind of demented glassy grin showing that she was not exactly
725all there,
⸢Bshowing that she was not exactly
725all there,B⸣

11 viewing with evident amusement the group of gazers round
726skipper
12 Murphy's nautical⸢2nautical2⸣ chest and then there was no more of her.


727
13The gunboat, the keeper said.


728
14It beats me, Mr Bloom confided to Stephen, medically I am speaking, how
729
15 a wretched creature like that from the Lock hospital reeking with disease
730
16 can be barefaced enough to solicit or how any man in his sober senses, if he
731
17 values his health in the least. Unfortunate creature! Of course I suppose
732
18 some man is ultimately responsible for her condition. Still no matter what
733
19the cause is from ....
⸢2Still no matter what
733
19the cause is from ....2⸣


734
20Stephen had not noticed her and shrugged his shoulders, merely
735
21 remarking:


736
22In this country people sell much more than she ever had and do a roaring
737
23 trade. Fear not them that sell the body but have not power to buy the soul.
738
24 She is a bad merchant. She buys dear and sells cheap.


739
25The elder man, though not by any manner of means an old maid or⸢4an old maid or4⸣
26 a
740 prude, said it was nothing short of a crying scandal that ought to be put
27a
741stop to instanter to say
⸢1that ought to be put
27a
741stop to instanter to say1⸣
that women of that 🕮 ⸢1[stamp,]stamp,stamp (quite
28apart from any
742oldmaidish squeamishness on the subject),
stamp (quite
28apart from any
742oldmaidish squeamishness on the subject),
1⸣
[stamp,]stamp,stamp (quite
28apart from any
742oldmaidish squeamishness on the subject),
stamp (quite
28apart from any
742oldmaidish squeamishness on the subject),
a necessary evil,
29 were not
743 licensed and medically inspected by the proper authorities, a thing,
30 he could
744 truthfully state, ⸢4[he]he he, he, 4⸣ [he]he he, he, as a ⸢4[ paterfamilias ] paterfamilias paterfamilias, paterfamilias, 4⸣ [ paterfamilias ] paterfamilias paterfamilias, paterfamilias, ⸢(B)as a ⸢4[ paterfamilias ] paterfamilias paterfamilias, paterfamilias, 4⸣ [ paterfamilias ] paterfamilias paterfamilias, paterfamilias, (B)⸣
31 was a stalwart advocate of from the
745 very first⸢2first2⸣ start. Whoever embarked
32 on a policy of the sort, he said, and
746ventilated the matter thoroughly
⸢1and
746ventilated the matter thoroughly1⸣

33 would confer a lasting boon on everybody
747 concerned.


748
34You as a good catholic, he ⸢2[subjoined,]subjoined, observed, observed, 2⸣ [subjoined,]subjoined, observed, observed, talking of body and
35 soul, believe in
749 the soul. Or do you mean the intelligence, the brainpower
36 as such, as
750 distinct from any outside object, the table, let us say, that cup. I
1 believe in
751 that myself because it has been explained by competent men as⸢(B)competent men as(B)⸣
2 the
752 convolutions of the ⸢2[brain.]brain. grey matter. grey matter. 2⸣ [brain.]brain. grey matter. grey matter. Otherwise we would never
3 have such
753 inventions as X  rays, for instance. Do you?


754
4Thus ⸢(B)[asked,]asked, cornered, cornered, (B)⸣ [asked,]asked, cornered, cornered, Stephen had to make a superhuman
5 effort of memory
755 to try ⸢2[to]to and and 2⸣ [to]to and and concentrate and remember before he
6 could say:


756
7They tell me on the best authority it is a simple substance and therefore
757
8 incorruptible. It would be immortal, I understand, but for the possibility
9 of
758 its annihilation by its First Cause Who, from all I can hear, is quite
10 capable
759 of adding that to the number of ⧼his⧽his His other practical jokes,
11 corruptio per se
760 and corruptio per accidens both being excluded by court
12 etiquette.


761
13Mr Bloom thoroughly acquiesced in the general gist of this though the
762
14 mystical finesse involved was a bit ⸢1[beyond him.]beyond him.out of his sublunary⸢3sublunary3⸣
15depth still he felt
763bound to enter a demurrer on the head of simple, ⸢2[remarking:]remarking:
16 promptly rejoining:

16 promptly rejoining:
2⸣
[remarking:]remarking:
16 promptly rejoining:

16 promptly rejoining:
out of his sublunary⸢3sublunary3⸣
15depth still he felt
763bound to enter a demurrer on the head of simple, ⸢2[remarking:]remarking:
16 promptly rejoining:

16 promptly rejoining:
2⸣
[remarking:]remarking:
16 promptly rejoining:

16 promptly rejoining:
1⸣
[beyond him.]beyond him.out of his sublunary⸢3sublunary3⸣
15depth still he felt
763bound to enter a demurrer on the head of simple, ⸢2[remarking:]remarking:
16 promptly rejoining:

16 promptly rejoining:
2⸣
[remarking:]remarking:
16 promptly rejoining:

16 promptly rejoining:
out of his sublunary⸢3sublunary3⸣
15depth still he felt
763bound to enter a demurrer on the head of simple, ⸢2[remarking:]remarking:
16 promptly rejoining:

16 promptly rejoining:
2⸣
[remarking:]remarking:
16 promptly rejoining:

16 promptly rejoining:


764
17 ⸢1[Simple, he demurred, ]Simple, he demurred, Simple? Simple? 1⸣ [Simple, he demurred, ]Simple, he demurred, Simple? Simple? I shouldn't think that is the proper
18 word. Of course, I grant you,
765 to concede a point, you do knock across a
19 simple soul once in a ⸢2[while.]while. blue moon. blue moon. 2⸣ [while.]while. blue moon. blue moon.
766 But what I am anxious to arrive
20 at is it is one thing for instance to invent
767 those rays Röntgen did or the
21 telescope like Edison, though I believe it was
768 before his time Galileo was the
22man, I mean, and the same applies toand the same applies to the
769 laws, for example, of a
23farreaching natural phenomenon such as electricity
770 but it's a horse of
24 quite another colour to say you believe in the existence ofthe existence of
771 a supernatural
25 God.


772
26O that, Stephen expostulated, has been proved conclusively by several of
773
27 the bestknown passages in Holy Writ, apart from circumstantial evidence.


774
28On this knotty point however the views of the pair, poles apart as they
775
29were both in schooling and everything else with the marked difference in
776
30 their respective ages, clashed.


777
31Has been? the more experienced of the two objected, sticking to his
778
32 original point with a smile of unbelief. I'm not so sure about that. That's a
779
33 matter for everyman's opinion ⸢2[and]and and, without dragging in the
34sectarian side
780of the business,
and, without dragging in the
34sectarian side
780of the business,
2⸣
[and]and and, without dragging in the
34sectarian side
780of the business,
and, without dragging in the
34sectarian side
780of the business,
I beg to differ with you in toto ⸢1 in toto 1⸣ there. ⸢(B)[Those]Those
35 ⸢1[It is my belief]It is my belief My belief ⸢3[is]is is, to tell you
781the candid truth,
is, to tell you
781the candid truth,
3⸣
[is]is is, to tell you
781the candid truth,
is, to tell you
781the candid truth,
My belief ⸢3[is]is is, to tell you
781the candid truth,
is, to tell you
781the candid truth,
3⸣
[is]is is, to tell you
781the candid truth,
is, to tell you
781the candid truth,
1⸣
[It is my belief]It is my belief My belief ⸢3[is]is is, to tell you
781the candid truth,
is, to tell you
781the candid truth,
3⸣
[is]is is, to tell you
781the candid truth,
is, to tell you
781the candid truth,
My belief ⸢3[is]is is, to tell you
781the candid truth,
is, to tell you
781the candid truth,
3⸣
[is]is is, to tell you
781the candid truth,
is, to tell you
781the candid truth,

36that those

35 ⸢1[It is my belief]It is my belief My belief ⸢3[is]is is, to tell you
781the candid truth,
is, to tell you
781the candid truth,
3⸣
[is]is is, to tell you
781the candid truth,
is, to tell you
781the candid truth,
My belief ⸢3[is]is is, to tell you
781the candid truth,
is, to tell you
781the candid truth,
3⸣
[is]is is, to tell you
781the candid truth,
is, to tell you
781the candid truth,
1⸣
[It is my belief]It is my belief My belief ⸢3[is]is is, to tell you
781the candid truth,
is, to tell you
781the candid truth,
3⸣
[is]is is, to tell you
781the candid truth,
is, to tell you
781the candid truth,
My belief ⸢3[is]is is, to tell you
781the candid truth,
is, to tell you
781the candid truth,
3⸣
[is]is is, to tell you
781the candid truth,
is, to tell you
781the candid truth,

36that those
(B)⸣
[Those]Those
35 ⸢1[It is my belief]It is my belief My belief ⸢3[is]is is, to tell you
781the candid truth,
is, to tell you
781the candid truth,
3⸣
[is]is is, to tell you
781the candid truth,
is, to tell you
781the candid truth,
My belief ⸢3[is]is is, to tell you
781the candid truth,
is, to tell you
781the candid truth,
3⸣
[is]is is, to tell you
781the candid truth,
is, to tell you
781the candid truth,
1⸣
[It is my belief]It is my belief My belief ⸢3[is]is is, to tell you
781the candid truth,
is, to tell you
781the candid truth,
3⸣
[is]is is, to tell you
781the candid truth,
is, to tell you
781the candid truth,
My belief ⸢3[is]is is, to tell you
781the candid truth,
is, to tell you
781the candid truth,
3⸣
[is]is is, to tell you
781the candid truth,
is, to tell you
781the candid truth,

36that those

35 ⸢1[It is my belief]It is my belief My belief ⸢3[is]is is, to tell you
781the candid truth,
is, to tell you
781the candid truth,
3⸣
[is]is is, to tell you
781the candid truth,
is, to tell you
781the candid truth,
My belief ⸢3[is]is is, to tell you
781the candid truth,
is, to tell you
781the candid truth,
3⸣
[is]is is, to tell you
781the candid truth,
is, to tell you
781the candid truth,
1⸣
[It is my belief]It is my belief My belief ⸢3[is]is is, to tell you
781the candid truth,
is, to tell you
781the candid truth,
3⸣
[is]is is, to tell you
781the candid truth,
is, to tell you
781the candid truth,
My belief ⸢3[is]is is, to tell you
781the candid truth,
is, to tell you
781the candid truth,
3⸣
[is]is is, to tell you
781the candid truth,
is, to tell you
781the candid truth,

36that those
bits were genuine forgeries all of them⸢1genuine forgeries all of them1⸣ put in by
782 monks most
1 probably or it's ⸢1[a]athethe 1⸣ [a]athethe big question of our national poet over
783again,
⸢1of our national poet over
783again,1⸣

2 who precisely wrote them like Hamlet and Bacon, as, you who know
784 your
3 Shakespeare infinitely better than I, of course I needn't tell you. Can't
785 you
4 drink that coffee, by the way? Let me stir it. And take a piece of that
786 bun.
5 It's like one of our skipper's bricks disguised. Still no‐one can give
787 what he
6 hasn't got. Try a bit.


788
7Couldn't, Stephen ⸢2[replied.]replied. contrived to get ⸢3[out.]out. out, his mental
8organs for the moment
789refusing to dictate further.
out, his mental
8organs for the moment
789refusing to dictate further.
3⸣
[out.]out. out, his mental
8organs for the moment
789refusing to dictate further.
out, his mental
8organs for the moment
789refusing to dictate further.
contrived to get ⸢3[out.]out. out, his mental
8organs for the moment
789refusing to dictate further.
out, his mental
8organs for the moment
789refusing to dictate further.
3⸣
[out.]out. out, his mental
8organs for the moment
789refusing to dictate further.
out, his mental
8organs for the moment
789refusing to dictate further.
2⸣
[replied.]replied. contrived to get ⸢3[out.]out. out, his mental
8organs for the moment
789refusing to dictate further.
out, his mental
8organs for the moment
789refusing to dictate further.
3⸣
[out.]out. out, his mental
8organs for the moment
789refusing to dictate further.
out, his mental
8organs for the moment
789refusing to dictate further.
contrived to get ⸢3[out.]out. out, his mental
8organs for the moment
789refusing to dictate further.
out, his mental
8organs for the moment
789refusing to dictate further.
3⸣
[out.]out. out, his mental
8organs for the moment
789refusing to dictate further.
out, his mental
8organs for the moment
789refusing to dictate further.


790
9Faultfinding being a proverbially bad hat Mr Bloom thought well to
791
10stir or try to the clotted sugar from the bottom and reflected with
11 something
792 approaching acrimony on the Coffee Palace and its temperance
12 (and
793 lucrative) work. To be sure it was a legitimate object and beyond yea
13or nay
⸢3was a legitimate object and beyond yea
13or nay3⸣

794 did a world of good, shelters such as the present one they were in
14 run on
795 teetotal lines for vagrants at night, concerts, dramatic evenings and
15 useful
796 lectures (admittance free)⸢2(admittance free)2⸣ by qualified men for the lower orders.
16 On the
797 other hand he had a distinct and painful⸢4and painful4⸣ recollection they paid his
17 wife,
798 Madam Marion ⸢(B)[Tweedy,]Tweedy, Tweedy who had been prominently
18associated with it at
799one time,
Tweedy who had been prominently
18associated with it at
799one time,
(B)⸣
[Tweedy,]Tweedy, Tweedy who had been prominently
18associated with it at
799one time,
Tweedy who had been prominently
18associated with it at
799one time,
a very modest remuneration indeed for her
19pianoplaying. The
800 idea, he was strongly inclined to believe, was to do
20 good and net a profit,
801 there being no competition⧼.⧽. to speak of. Sulphate
21 of copper poison SO₄ or
802 something in some dried peas he remembered
22 reading of in a cheap
803 eatinghouse somewhere but he couldn't remember
23 when it was or where.
804Anyhow inspection, medical inspection, of all
24eatables seemed to him more
805 than ever ⸢2[necessary.]necessary. necessary which
25possibly accounted for the vogue of Dr Tibble's
806Vi‐Cocoa on account of
26the medical analysis involved.
necessary which
25possibly accounted for the vogue of Dr Tibble's
806Vi‐Cocoa on account of
26the medical analysis involved.
2⸣
[necessary.]necessary. necessary which
25possibly accounted for the vogue of Dr Tibble's
806Vi‐Cocoa on account of
26the medical analysis involved.
necessary which
25possibly accounted for the vogue of Dr Tibble's
806Vi‐Cocoa on account of
26the medical analysis involved.


807
27Have a shot at it now, he ventured to say of the coffee after being stirred.


808
28Thus prevailed on to at any rate taste it Stephen lifted the heavy mug
809
29 from the brown puddle it clopped out of when taken up by the handle and
810
30 took a ⸢2[sip.]sip. sip of the offending beverage. sip of the offending beverage. 2⸣ [sip.]sip. sip of the offending beverage. sip of the offending beverage.


811
31Still it's solid food, his good genius urged, I'm a stickler for solid food,
812
32 his one and only reason being not gormandising in the least⸢2in the least2⸣ but regular
813
33 meals as the ⧼con⧽con sine qua non for any kind of proper work, mental or
34 manual.
814 You ought to eat more solid food. You would feel a different man.


815
35Liquids I can eat, Stephen said. But O, obligate⧽obligate oblige oblige obligate⧽obligate oblige oblige me by taking
36 away that
816 knife. I can't look at the point of it. It reminds me of Roman
37 history.
817


1Mr Bloom promptly did as suggested and removed the incriminated
818
2 article, a blunt hornhandled ordinary knife with nothing ⸢2[very]very
3particularly

3particularly
2⸣
[very]very
3particularly

3particularly

819 Roman or antique about⧽about ⸢2[in]in about about 2⸣ [in]in about about ⸢2[in]in about about 2⸣ [in]in about about about⧽about ⸢2[in]in about about 2⸣ [in]in about about ⸢2[in]in about about 2⸣ [in]in about about it to the lay⸢4lay4⸣ eyeto the lay⸢4lay4⸣ eye,
4 observing that the point was the
820 least conspicuous point about it.


821
5Our mutual friend's stories are like himself, Mr Bloom apropos of
6knives
822 remarked to ⸢1[Stephen]Stephenhis confidante his confidante 1⸣ [Stephen]Stephenhis confidante his confidante sotto voce. Do you think
7 they are genuine? He
823 could spin those yarns for hours on end all night long
8 and lie like old boots.
824 Look at him.


825
9Yet still though his eyes were thick with sleep and sea air life was full
826
10 of a host of things and coincidences of a terrible nature and it was quite
827
11 within the bounds of possibility that it was not an entire fabrication though
828
12 at first blush there was not much inherent probability in all ⸢3[he said]he said the
13spoof he got
829off his chest
the
13spoof he got
829off his chest
3⸣
[he said]he said the
13spoof he got
829off his chest
the
13spoof he got
829off his chest
being strictly ⸢3[accurate.]accurate. accurate gospel. accurate gospel. 3⸣ [accurate.]accurate. accurate gospel. accurate gospel.


830
14He had been meantime taking stock of the individual in front of ⸢1[him.]him.
15 him
831and Sherlockholmesing him ⸢4[up.]up. up ever since he clapped
16eyes on him.
up ever since he clapped
16eyes on him.
4⸣
[up.]up. up ever since he clapped
16eyes on him.
up ever since he clapped
16eyes on him.

15 him
831and Sherlockholmesing him ⸢4[up.]up. up ever since he clapped
16eyes on him.
up ever since he clapped
16eyes on him.
4⸣
[up.]up. up ever since he clapped
16eyes on him.
up ever since he clapped
16eyes on him.
1⸣
[him.]him.
15 him
831and Sherlockholmesing him ⸢4[up.]up. up ever since he clapped
16eyes on him.
up ever since he clapped
16eyes on him.
4⸣
[up.]up. up ever since he clapped
16eyes on him.
up ever since he clapped
16eyes on him.

15 him
831and Sherlockholmesing him ⸢4[up.]up. up ever since he clapped
16eyes on him.
up ever since he clapped
16eyes on him.
4⸣
[up.]up. up ever since he clapped
16eyes on him.
up ever since he clapped
16eyes on him.
Though
832 a wellpreserved ⸢(B)[man,]man, man of no little stamina, man of no little stamina, (B)⸣ [man,]man, man of no little stamina, man of no little stamina,
17 if a trifle prone to baldness, there
833 was something spuriousspurious in the cut of his
18 jib that suggested a jail delivery
834 and it required no violent stretch of
19 imagination to associate such a
835 weirdlooking specimen with the oakum and
20 treadmill fraternity. He might
836 even have done for his man supposing it
21 was his own case he told, as people
837 often did about others, namely, that he
22 killed him ⸢(B)[himself.]himself. himself and had served
838his four or five goodlooking
23years in durance vile to say nothing of the
839Antonio personage (no relation
24to thethe dramatic personage of identical name
840 who sprang from the pen of
25our national poet)
⸢1(no relation
24to thethe dramatic personage of identical name
840 who sprang from the pen of
25our national poet)1⸣
who expiated his crimes in
841the melodramatic⸢2melodramatic2⸣ manner
26above
⸢2
26above2⸣
described.
himself and had served
838his four or five goodlooking
23years in durance vile to say nothing of the
839Antonio personage (no relation
24to thethe dramatic personage of identical name
840 who sprang from the pen of
25our national poet)
⸢1(no relation
24to thethe dramatic personage of identical name
840 who sprang from the pen of
25our national poet)1⸣
who expiated his crimes in
841the melodramatic⸢2melodramatic2⸣ manner
26above
⸢2
26above2⸣
described.
(B)⸣
[himself.]himself. himself and had served
838his four or five goodlooking
23years in durance vile to say nothing of the
839Antonio personage (no relation
24to thethe dramatic personage of identical name
840 who sprang from the pen of
25our national poet)
⸢1(no relation
24to thethe dramatic personage of identical name
840 who sprang from the pen of
25our national poet)1⸣
who expiated his crimes in
841the melodramatic⸢2melodramatic2⸣ manner
26above
⸢2
26above2⸣
described.
himself and had served
838his four or five goodlooking
23years in durance vile to say nothing of the
839Antonio personage (no relation
24to thethe dramatic personage of identical name
840 who sprang from the pen of
25our national poet)
⸢1(no relation
24to thethe dramatic personage of identical name
840 who sprang from the pen of
25our national poet)1⸣
who expiated his crimes in
841the melodramatic⸢2melodramatic2⸣ manner
26above
⸢2
26above2⸣
described.
On the other hand he might be
842 only bluffing, a
27 pardonable weakness because meeting unmistakable⸢1unmistakable1⸣ mugs,
843 Dublin
28 residents, like those jarvies waiting news from abroad would tempt
844 any
29 ancient mariner who sailed the ocean seas⸢2who sailed the ocean seas2⸣ to draw the long bow about
845 the
30 schooner Hesperus and etcetera. And when all was said and done the
846 lies a
31 fellow told about himself couldn't probably hold a proverbial⸢1proverbial1⸣ candle
847 to
32 the wholesale⸢1wholesale1⸣ whoppers other fellows ⸢3[told]told coined coined 3⸣ [told]told coined coined about him.


848
33Mind you, I'm not saying that it's all a pure invention, he resumed.
849
34 Analogous scenes are occasionally, if not often, met with. Giants, though
850
35 that is rather a far cry, you see once in a way, Marcella the midget
36 queen. In
851 those waxworks in Henry street I myself saw some Aztecs, as
1 they are
852 called, sitting bowlegged, they couldn't straighten their legs if
2you paid
853them
⸢(B)if
2you paid
853them(B)⸣
because the muscles here, you see, he proceeded, indicating
3 on his
854 companion the brief outline of the sinews or whatever you like to call
4them
855 behind the right knee, were utterly powerless from sitting that way so
5 long
856 cramped up, being adored as gods. There's an example again of
6 simple⧼.⧽.
857 souls.


858
7However reverting to friend Sinbad and his horrifying adventures
859
8(who reminded him a bit of Ludwig, alias Ledwidge, when he occupied the
860
9boards of the Gaiety when Michael Gunn was identified with the
861
10 management
when Michael Gunn was identified with the
861
10 management
in the Flying ⸢3[ Dutchman ] Dutchman Dutchman, a stupendous
11success,
Dutchman, a stupendous
11success,
3⸣
[ Dutchman ] Dutchman Dutchman, a stupendous
11success,
Dutchman, a stupendous
11success,
and his host of
862admirers came in large numbers,
⸢3his host of
862admirers came in large numbers,3⸣
everyone
12simply ⸢3[flocked]flocked flocking flocking 3⸣ [flocked]flocked flocking flocking to hear him
863 though ships of any
13sort , phantom or the reverse,, phantom or the reverse, on the stage usually fell a
864bit flat as also did
14trains
⸢4 though ships of any
13sort , phantom or the reverse,, phantom or the reverse, on the stage usually fell a
864bit flat as also did
14trains4⸣
)
⸢2
8(who reminded him a bit of Ludwig, alias Ledwidge, when he occupied the
860
9boards of the Gaiety when Michael Gunn was identified with the
861
10 management
when Michael Gunn was identified with the
861
10 management
in the Flying ⸢3[ Dutchman ] Dutchman Dutchman, a stupendous
11success,
Dutchman, a stupendous
11success,
3⸣
[ Dutchman ] Dutchman Dutchman, a stupendous
11success,
Dutchman, a stupendous
11success,
and his host of
862admirers came in large numbers,
⸢3his host of
862admirers came in large numbers,3⸣
everyone
12simply ⸢3[flocked]flocked flocking flocking 3⸣ [flocked]flocked flocking flocking to hear him
863 though ships of any
13sort , phantom or the reverse,, phantom or the reverse, on the stage usually fell a
864bit flat as also did
14trains
⸢4 though ships of any
13sort , phantom or the reverse,, phantom or the reverse, on the stage usually fell a
864bit flat as also did
14trains4⸣
)2⸣
there was nothing intrinsically incompatible about
865 it, he
15 conceded. On the contrary that stab in the back touch was quite ⸢(B)[typical
16of]
typical
16of
in
866keeping with
in
866keeping with
(B)⸣
[typical
16of]
typical
16of
in
866keeping with
in
866keeping with
those italianos though candidly he was none the
17less
⸢1none the
17less1⸣
free to
867 admit those ⸢(B)[icecream and fishfriers ]icecream and fishfriers icecreamers and
18friers in the fish way not to mention the chip
868potato ⸢3[persuasion]persuasion variety variety 3⸣ [persuasion]persuasion variety variety
icecreamers and
18friers in the fish way not to mention the chip
868potato ⸢3[persuasion]persuasion variety variety 3⸣ [persuasion]persuasion variety variety
(B)⸣
[icecream and fishfriers ]icecream and fishfriers icecreamers and
18friers in the fish way not to mention the chip
868potato ⸢3[persuasion]persuasion variety variety 3⸣ [persuasion]persuasion variety variety
icecreamers and
18friers in the fish way not to mention the chip
868potato ⸢3[persuasion]persuasion variety variety 3⸣ [persuasion]persuasion variety variety

19 and so forth over in little Italy there near the Coombe were
869 sober thrifty
20 hardworking fellows except perhaps a bit too given to
870 pothunting the
21 harmless necessary ⸢(B)[cat]cat animal of the feline persuasion animal of the feline persuasion (B)⸣ [cat]cat animal of the feline persuasion animal of the feline persuasion of others
871 at
22 night so as to have a good old succulent ⸢3[meal]meal tuckin tuckin 3⸣ [meal]meal tuckin tuckin with garlic de
23 rigueur
off
872 him or her next day on the quiet and, he added, on the cheap.


873
24Spaniards, for instance, he continued, passionate [2impetuous]impetuous
25 temperaments like ⸢2[that]that that,
874impetuous as Old Nick,
that,
874impetuous as Old Nick,
2⸣
[that]that that,
874impetuous as Old Nick,
that,
874impetuous as Old Nick,
are given to taking
26 the law into their own hands
875 and give you your quietus doublequick with
27 those poignards they carry in
876 the abdomen. It comes from the great heat,
28 climate generally. My wife is, so
877 to speak, Spanish, half that is. Point of
29fact she could actually claim
878Spanish nationality if she wanted, having
30been born in (technically) Spain,
879i.e. Gibraltar.
⸢(B)Point of
29fact she could actually claim
878Spanish nationality if she wanted, having
30been born in (technically) Spain,
879i.e. Gibraltar.(B)⸣
She has the Spanish type.
31 Quite dark, regular brunette, black.
880I for one certainly believe climate
32 accounts for character. That's why I
881 asked you if you wrote your⸢2your2⸣ poetry
33 in Italian.


882
34The temperaments at the door, Stephen interposed with, were very
883
35 passionate about ⸢4[five]five ten ten 4⸣ [five]five ten ten shillings. Roberto ruba roba sua.


884
1Quite so, Mr Bloom ⸢(B)[agreed.]agreed. dittoed. dittoed. (B)⸣ [agreed.]agreed. dittoed. dittoed.


885
2Then, Stephen said staring and rambling on to himself or some unknown
886
3 listener somewhere, we have the impetuosity of Dante and the isosceles
887
4 triangle miss Portinari he fell in love with and Leonardo and san Tommaso
888
5 Mastino.


889
6It's in the blood, Mr Bloom acceded at once. All are washed in the blood
890
7 of the sun. Coincidence I just happened to be in the Kildare street museum
891
8 today, shortly prior to our meeting if I can so call it, and I was just looking
892
9 at those antique statues there. The splendid proportions of hips, bosom.
893
10 You simply don't knock against those kind of women here. An exception
894
11 here and there. Handsome yes, pretty in a way you find but what⸢4what4⸣ I'm
895
12 talking about is⸢4is4⸣ the female form. Besides they have so little taste in dress,
896
13 most of ⸢4[them.]them. them, which greatly enhances a woman's natural beauty,
14no matter
897what you say.
them, which greatly enhances a woman's natural beauty,
14no matter
897what you say.
4⸣
[them.]them. them, which greatly enhances a woman's natural beauty,
14no matter
897what you say.
them, which greatly enhances a woman's natural beauty,
14no matter
897what you say.
Rumpled stockings, it may be, possibly is, a foible
15 of mine but
898 still it's a thing I simply hate to see.


899
16Interest, however, was ⸢1[beginning]beginningstartingstarting 1⸣ [beginning]beginningstartingstarting to flag somewhat all
17 round and then
900the others got on to talking about accidents at sea, ships
18 lost in a fog,
901collisions with icebergs, all that sort of thing. ⸢1[The sailor ]The sailor
19Shipahoy

19Shipahoy
1⸣
[The sailor ]The sailor
19Shipahoy

19Shipahoy
of course had his
902 own say to say. He had doubled the cape a
20 few odd times and weathered a
903 monsoon, a kind of wind, in the China seas
21 and through all those perils of
904 the deep there was one thing, he declared,
22 stood to him or words to that
905 effect, a pious medal he had that saved him.


906
23So then after that they drifted on to the wreck off Daunt's rock,
24 wreck
907 of ⸢(B)[the]the that illfated that illfated (B)⸣ [the]the that illfated that illfated Norwegian barque nobody could think of
25 her name for the
908 moment till the jarvey who had really quite a look of
26 Henry Campbell
909 remembered it Palme on Booterstown strand. That was
27 the talk of the town
910 that ⸢2[year,]year, year (Albert William Quill wrote a fine
28piece of originaloriginal verse of
911 distinctive merit
of
911 distinctive merit
on the topic for the Irish
29 Times
),
year (Albert William Quill wrote a fine
28piece of originaloriginal verse of
911 distinctive merit
of
911 distinctive merit
on the topic for the Irish
29 Times
),
2⸣
[year,]year, year (Albert William Quill wrote a fine
28piece of originaloriginal verse of
911 distinctive merit
of
911 distinctive merit
on the topic for the Irish
29 Times
),
year (Albert William Quill wrote a fine
28piece of originaloriginal verse of
911 distinctive merit
of
911 distinctive merit
on the topic for the Irish
29 Times
),
breakers running over
912 her and crowds and crowds on the shore
30in commotion
⸢3
30in commotion3⸣
petrified with
913 horror. Then someone said something
31about the case of the s. s. Lady
914 Cairns
of Swansea run into by the Mona
32 which was on an opposite tack in
915rather muggyish weather
⸢3in
915rather muggyish weather3⸣
and lost with
33 all ⸢3[hands.]hands. hands on deck. hands on deck. 3⸣ [hands.]hands. hands on deck. hands on deck. No aid was given.
916 Her master, the Mona's,
34 said he was afraid his collision bulkhead would
917 give way. She had no
35 water, it appears, in her hold.


918
36At this stage an incident happened. It having become necessary for
919
37 him to unfurl a reef the sailor vacated his seat.


920
1Let me cross your bows mate, he said to his neighbour who was just
921
2 gently dropping off into a peaceful⸢2peaceful2⸣ doze.


922
3He ⸢3[walked]walked made tracks made tracks 3⸣ [walked]walked made tracks made tracks heavily, slowly with a dumpy sort of a
4gait
⸢(B)with a dumpy sort of a
4gait(B)⸣
to the
923 door, stepped heavily down the one step there was out of the
5 shelter and
924 bore due ⸢(B)[left with a dumpy 🕮 kind of a gait. ]left with a dumpy 🕮 kind of a gait. left. left. (B)⸣ [left with a dumpy 🕮 kind of a gait. ]left with a dumpy 🕮 kind of a gait. left. left. While
6 he was in the act of getting his bearings Mr Bloom who
925 noticed when he
7 stood up that he had two flasks of presumably ship's rum
926 sticking one out
8 of each pocket for the private consumption of his burning
927 interior, saw him ⸢3[take one out]take one out
9 produce a bottle

9 produce a bottle
3⸣
[take one out]take one out
9 produce a bottle

9 produce a bottle
and uncork it or unscrew ⸢1[and]andand,
10applying
928its nozzle to his lips,
and,
10applying
928its nozzle to his lips,
1⸣
[and]andand,
10applying
928its nozzle to his lips,
and,
10applying
928its nozzle to his lips,
take a good old delectable⸢2delectable2⸣ swig out of ⸢4[it. ]it.
11 it with a
929gurgling sound⧽sound noise noise sound⧽sound noise noise .

11 it with a
929gurgling sound⧽sound noise noise sound⧽sound noise noise .
4⸣
[it. ]it.
11 it with a
929gurgling sound⧽sound noise noise sound⧽sound noise noise .

11 it with a
929gurgling sound⧽sound noise noise sound⧽sound noise noise .
The irrepressible Bloom, who
12 also had a shrewd suspicion
930 ⸢4[he]he that the old stager that the old stager 4⸣ [he]he that the old stager that the old stager went out on a
13manoeuvre after the ⸢B[female attraction]female attraction counterattraction in
931the shape of a
14female
counterattraction in
931the shape of a
14female
B⸣
[female attraction]female attraction counterattraction in
931the shape of a
14female
counterattraction in
931the shape of a
14female
who however had disappeared to all intents and
932 purposes, could by
15straining just perceive him , when duly ⸢B[refreshed,]refreshed, refreshed by his
933 ⧼ priv⧽ priv
16potations,⧽

16potations,
rum puncheon exploit,
refreshed by his
933 ⧼ priv⧽ priv
16potations,⧽

16potations,
rum puncheon exploit,
B⸣
[refreshed,]refreshed, refreshed by his
933 ⧼ priv⧽ priv
16potations,⧽

16potations,
rum puncheon exploit,
refreshed by his
933 ⧼ priv⧽ priv
16potations,⧽

16potations,
rum puncheon exploit,
, when duly ⸢B[refreshed,]refreshed, refreshed by his
933 ⧼ priv⧽ priv
16potations,⧽

16potations,
rum puncheon exploit,
refreshed by his
933 ⧼ priv⧽ priv
16potations,⧽

16potations,
rum puncheon exploit,
B⸣
[refreshed,]refreshed, refreshed by his
933 ⧼ priv⧽ priv
16potations,⧽

16potations,
rum puncheon exploit,
refreshed by his
933 ⧼ priv⧽ priv
16potations,⧽

16potations,
rum puncheon exploit,
gaping up at the piers and girders of
17 the Loop line
934 rather out of his depth as of course it was all radically altered
18 since his last
935 visit and greatly improved. Some person or persons invisible
19 directed him to
936 the male⸢2male2⸣ urinal erected by the cleansing committee all
20 over the place for the
937purpose but after a brief space of time during which
21 silence reigned
938supreme the ⸢3[sailor]sailor sailor, evidently giving it a wide
22berth,
sailor, evidently giving it a wide
22berth,
3⸣
[sailor]sailor sailor, evidently giving it a wide
22berth,
sailor, evidently giving it a wide
22berth,
eased himself ⧼nearer⧽nearer